Did Tony Montana really exist?

Al Pacino delivers a memorable performance as the fictional bandit Tony Montana, known as “Scarface”, in the film of the same name directed by Brian de Palma released in 1983.

Arte
Sunday May 26 at 9:00 p.m.

16/9 | Prohibited for children under 12

Arte

Arte
Sunday June 9 at 11:00 p.m.

16/9 | Prohibited for children under 12

It’s hard to forget Al Pacino’s performance in Scarface. Released in 1983, the gangster thriller directed by Brian de Palma has become an essential film for fans of the genre, even though it is a remake of a film dating from 1932. We follow the story of ‘Antonio “Tony” Montana, a small-time thug who becomes a drug lord and the American mafia in Florida. Al Pacino plays opposite Steven Bauer and Michelle Pfeiffer in this uplifting gangster film.

But make no mistake, Tony Montana never existed. The character from the original 1932 film portrays an alternate version of Al Capone, a famous Chicago gangster who was himself nicknamed “Scarface”. In Brian de Palma’s version, it is Oliver Stone who is in charge of writing the screenplay, and who decides to change the locations (Chicago becomes Florida) and the trafficking in which he was engaged (the smuggling of alcohol becomes drug trafficking), among other changes made. And the name “Tony Montana” is a tribute to an American football player adored by Oliver Stone, Joe Montana.

Synopsis – Antonio Montana, known as Tony (Al Pacino), is expelled from Cuba in the early 80s and ends up in Miami. He is accompanied by his friend Manolo Ribera, known as Manny (Steven Bauer), with whom he commits some small crimes. Tony is quickly spotted by drug mafiosos who offer him work for them. He then becomes everyone’s trusted man: suppliers, resellers, police officers. And he ends up leading the mafia in Florida like he always dreamed of. He even marries a beautiful woman, Elvira (Michelle Pfeiffer), whom he displays like a trophy. But very quickly, Tony realizes that he is not happier at the top. And that many people want to bring down number 1.

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