China announces opening anti-dumping investigation into imports of European pork

China announces opening anti-dumping investigation into imports of European pork
China announces opening anti-dumping investigation into imports of European pork

China announced on Monday that it had launched an anti-dumping investigation into imports of pork and pork products from the European Union.

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The Ministry of Commerce “has opened an anti-dumping investigation into imports of pork and products from the European Union,” it said in a statement. The investigation followed a request “officially submitted by the China Livestock Association on behalf of the domestic pork industry,” the ministry said.

This announcement comes against a backdrop of growing trade tensions between China and the European Union.

The EU said last week it would impose additional tariffs on imports of Chinese electric vehicles from next month, following an anti-subsidy investigation opened in September 2023.

Vehicles manufactured in Chinese factories were until now taxed at 10% in the EU. Brussels plans to add countervailing duties of 17.4% for the Chinese manufacturer BYD, 20% for Geely and 38.1% for SAIC, after nearly nine months of investigation.

Beijing then immediately denounced “purely protectionist behavior” by Europeans, via a press release from the Ministry of Commerce. China had warned that it would take “all measures to firmly defend its legitimate rights.”

In January, it had already opened an anti-dumping investigation into European brandies, including French cognac.

Launched after a complaint from Chinese alcohol professionals, this procedure is also considered by observers as a measure of retaliation to the European investigation into subsidies for electric cars produced in China, largely supported by France.

China, on the occasion of its President Xi Jinping’s visit to France at the beginning of May, nevertheless gave some guarantees to Paris by committing to facilitate access to certain French products, including pork intestines.

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