Ruppen refuses to wipe the slate clean

Ruppen refuses to wipe the slate clean
Ruppen refuses to wipe the slate clean

“It is a very unfortunate coincidence that the bad weather occurred so soon after the presentation of our analysis,” said Valais State Councillor Franzen Ruppen.

Photo: KEYSTONE/JEAN-CHRISTOPHE BOTT

The revision of the third correction of the Rhone does not provide for a complete resizing of the project, stresses the Valais State Councilor Franz Ruppen. The Upper Valaisan defends the revision and wants the work to be carried out as a priority in Sierre.

In an interview with the NZZ on Saturday, the head of government said that not everything in the third Rhone correction should be thrown away. A large part of the results of previous studies can be reused.

“There was never a decision to resize the project, and even less to suspend it,” Mr. Ruppen said. The State Councilor had indicated earlier this week on Canal9 that the aim of the review was to optimize the project and put the safety of people and property first.

Bridges too low in Sierre

In the immediate future, the natural hazards department is examining the necessary adaptations over the next year and a half. Mr. Ruppen considers it a ‘priority’ that work be undertaken in Sierre (VS). Two bridges were blocked by wood last weekend and caused significant flooding in the area. Mr. Ruppen wants these departments to raise the bridges and deepen the river.

The Valais State Council announced at the end of May that it had decided to revise the project for the third correction of the Rhone. Based on a new analysis, it considered the current development plan to be ‘disproportionate’. A working group was tasked with establishing a timetable.

The government considers that the third correction of the Rhone as defined to date is a five-star project which sets the security bar ‘very very high’ and which is ‘alarmist’.

/ATS

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