Disappearance of MH370: can a signal picked up by a submarine help investigators solve the mystery?

Disappearance of MH370: can a signal picked up by a submarine help investigators solve the mystery?
Disappearance of MH370: can a signal picked up by a submarine help investigators solve the mystery?

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Researchers from Cardiff University have revealed that a signal was detected by a submarine at the same time as MH370’s probable impact.

Last week, a group of French experts who have been investigating the disappearance of MH370 for nearly ten years defined a search area where the wreckage of the Boeing 777 could be located. This 2,000 km² area has never before been swept by underwater search teams. This Monday, February 17, The Telegraph reveals that researchers at Cardiff University have detected a signal that could help solve this mystery.

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On March 8, 2014, MH370 disappeared, with 239 people on board, while it was supposed to connect Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. Since then, despite colossal international efforts, the location of the plane remains a mystery and it has never been found in the southern Indian Ocean after having left a last signal at 8:11 a.m. as indicated by Immarsat.

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A signal picked up by a submarine?

But Welsh scientists have developed a theory, with evidence to back it up. Their hypothesis is as follows: a 200-ton plane, crashing at a speed of 200 meters per second, would release as much kinetic energy as a small earthquake. Thus, during the shock, the wave could have been captured by submarines located thousands of kilometers away.

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British researchers reportedly picked up a signal using the submarines’ microphones at the alleged time of the crash. Thus, in its research, the Cardiff University team identified a signal, at the Cape Leeuwin station (on the coast of Western Australia) which could coincide with the narrow period during which the plane could have to crash.

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“This raises questions about its origin,” researcher Usama Kadri said of the signal. Because it was not detected on the British territory of the Diego Garcia station in the Indian Ocean, despite the approximately equivalent distance which separates the two stations from the signal captured. Usama Kadri also noted that “given the sensitivity of hydrophones, it is very unlikely that a large aircraft hitting the ocean surface would not leave a detectable pressure signature.” However, further tests would be necessary to validate this hypothesis.

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