Young people and the media: a love story to understand

Young people and the media: a love story to understand
Young people and the media: a love story to understand

How can we manage the challenges generated by educating young people about information and the media? This is the question that will be asked this evening during the round table at a scientific café at the University of Neuchâtel. Journalists, researchers and academicians will try to understand the links between journalists, teachers and young audiences. Professor of information and communication sciences at the Universities of Lorraine and speaker, Anne Cordier has shown in her research that young people are significantly interested in current affairs, contrary to popular belief. “There is a real interest in information from young people. This is an interest in information from the child or adolescent’s point of view, which is normal. This is evident in information relating to hobbies, interests, but also social issues, particularly gender issues,” analyzes Anne Cordier.

Requests to the media

During her field research with young people aged 10 to 16, the French researcher was able to dialogue with this public and observe that they had demands from the media. “He does not want to be judged on these practices. Young people use social networks as a platform to access media content, so they are fed up with people constantly saying, particularly in the journalistic world, that social networks are dangerous,” explains Anne Cordier. Another demand, young people would like to be more respected by the media, in particular that we do not speak to them as if they had no vocabulary. “It’s as if you always had to wear a hoodie to look young,” says the professor at the Universities of Lorraine in Information and Communication Sciences.

Harmful anxiety-provoking context

The last claim given by Anne Cordier is linked to the current anxiety-provoking context. With the wars in Ukraine and between Israel and Hamas, the disasters linked to climate change, the consumption of information can sometimes be anxiety-provoking. “Young people sometimes feel helpless when faced with this information. This shows a demand for power to act and therefore they also need to hear information that allows them to tell themselves that it is worth living. I insist on this because 13-year-old students have already told us that when they see certain information, they do not want to live,” asserts Anne Cordier. /dpi

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