Guinea: repression by military power left at least 47 dead according to Amnesty International | TV5MONDE

Guinea: repression by military power left at least 47 dead according to Amnesty International | TV5MONDE
Guinea: repression by military power left at least 47 dead according to Amnesty International | TV5MONDE

The repression of demonstrations in Guinea has left at least 47 dead, the vast majority of them young people, since the military took power in September 2021, says Amnesty International in a report published this Wednesday, May 15.

More than 75% of the 47 people killed were under 25, and 40% were minors under 18, the report said. A higher number were seriously injured during protests by individuals identified as members of the security forces, he said.

75% of people killed are under 25 years old

Between 2019 and 2021, at least 66 people had already been killed, mainly during rallies opposing the constitutional reform project initiated by President Alpha Condé to run for a third term, says Amnesty.

The NGO assures that repression continued under the regime of the National Committee of Rally for Development (CNRD) led by Colonel Mamadi Doumbouya who overthrew President Condé in 2021.

“Despite the CRND’s promises to tackle the problem of excessive use of force under Alpha Condé, including in cases of unlawful killings, this extremely serious situation persists, in a general context of repression of dissident voices “declared Samira Daoud, Amnesty director for West and Central Africa on the occasion of the publication of this report.

Ban on demonstrations since 2022

The military power has banned all demonstrations since 2022, and has arrested, prosecuted or pushed into exile a certain number of opposition leaders. She declared the dissolution of a collective on the front line against Alpha Condé and also active against the junta. It restricted access to the internet for three months, removed television channels from the main distribution packages and jammed radio frequencies.

“Since 2019, there have been few convictions of members of the defense and security forces for illegal use of force,” deplores Amnesty.

Public and private health centers have refused to treat victims for fear of reprisals, she says.

Prime Minister Amadou Oury Bah acknowledged in March that the junta should remain in power until at least 2025 and break its commitment to leave by the end of 2024.

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