the measure proposed by Gabriel Attal is much less advantageous than the complementary solidarity health system – Libération

the measure proposed by Gabriel Attal is much less advantageous than the complementary solidarity health system – Libération
the measure proposed by Gabriel Attal is much less advantageous than the complementary solidarity health system – Libération

The Prime Minister presented on Saturday June 15 certain proposals which would be put in place in the event of victory of the presidential camp in the next legislative elections. Including a mutual fund at 1 euro per day, more expensive than the current C2S created in the 2000s.

At best, it’s a flash in the pan announcement, at worst, it’s a regression. Saturday June 15, the Prime Minister, Gabriel Attal, revealed the broad outlines of the Renaissance party’s program for the legislative elections of June 30 and July 7. Measures mainly focused on purchasing power. One of them raised eyebrows among some health professionals and economists: the announcement of the establishment of complementary health insurance “public” at 1 euro per day, for those who are not covered by mutual insurance.

The problem is that a much more advantageous system already exists: complementary solidarity health insurance or C2S. “It was formerly universal health coverage (CMU) launched in the 2000s,” specifies economist Nicolas Da Silva. This public assistance, which is added to the reimbursement provided by Social Security for health expenses, is reserved for people whose resources are modest. There are two types of C2S: free and paid. Eligibility for one or the other “depends on the income threshold and the composition of the household”, develops Nicolas Da Silva.

Indexed financial participation

Thus, health expenses can be completely free for a person earning up to 10,166 euros of income per year, according to the health insurance website. No need for calculation to understand that it is less than the euro proposed by Gabriel Attal. People eligible for paid C2S are those whose resources range from 10,166 euros to 13,724 euros per year. The financial contribution is then indexed to the age of the beneficiary. “For example, people aged 29 and under must pay 8 euros per month, because we consider that the younger you are, the less sick you are,” continues Nicolas Da Silva. That’s about 3 cents per day. Again, it is less than 1 euro.

What about older people, considered to be more at risk of developing diseases? “The highest financial participation threshold concerns those aged 70 and over”, indicates the economist. They are asked for a compensation of 30 euros per month. Thus, one euro per day is already the maximum amount to pay for a C2S beneficiary. The measure announced by Gabriel Attal therefore brings nothing new. Worse: if it were implemented, it would be a regression compared to the system that currently exists.

Problem of “non-recourse to the law”

For Nicolas Da Silva, “the problem today is not the absence of rights for the most precarious, but a non-recourse to the law.” Around a third of the 11 million people eligible for C2S did not benefit from it in 2020, according to estimates from the Directorate of Research, Studies, Evaluation and Statistics. The reasons are multiple: lack of awareness of this assistance, fear of discrimination or difficulty in carrying out the necessary procedures… “It’s sometimes a real administrative obstacle course to implement it,” sighs the economist.

An announcement from the Prime Minister on “a system to combat non-recourse” to this right would have been “more useful”. “It would have made sense,” says Nicolas Da Silva. Especially when we know that lack of access to financial aid for health expenses leads to a potentially dangerous situation: forgoing care.

-

-

PREV Hurricane Beryl hits Texas and oil prices
NEXT Saillagouse – Viking Day and fair this Sunday