“We hope that prices will be attractive enough for farmers to continue betting on garlic”

“We hope that prices will be attractive enough for farmers to continue betting on garlic”
“We hope that prices will be attractive enough for farmers to continue betting on garlic”

The garlic campaign began in the second week of May in Andalusia, where the planting area has decreased considerably in the last two seasons, with drops between 20% and 25% each time.

“In general, farmers are very professional and manage crops very well despite strong legislative restrictions on agrochemicals, which puts them at a competitive disadvantage compared to other origins. So we hope that the yields and quality will be good,” says Juan Carlos Navarro, manager of Big Garlic.

The new garlic season has arrived, according to the producer and marketer, in a market context without stocks. “The shortage of product, due to damage caused by heavy rains during last season’s garlic harvest, has complicated the market. The season started with suitable climate and good cultivation. The demand is good and we hope it continues like this. The market values ​​the quality and food safety of Spanish garlic,” he emphasizes.

This week begins the earliest harvests in Castile-La Mancha, where, according to Juan Carlos Navarro, the area dedicated to this crop has also decreased in the last two seasons, by 12% and 14% respectively. Nevertheless, it remains by far the largest garlic-producing region in Spain, with some 16,000 hectares this season.

“Purple garlic has seen its production area decrease because the yield per hectare is lower than that of spring garlic, which translates into an increase in the cost per kilo. Without a doubt, purple garlic is a variety with a more intense flavor and which evolves better over time after harvest. These are economic factors that have facilitated its reduction in planting area, but this should not affect the overall export of Spanish garlic. »

“The quality is excellent and the sizes are large, which means that the yields per hectare will be good,” says Juan Carlos. “Reductions in surface area are generally associated with a loss of profitability of the crop due to the imbalance between the sales price and the cost of production. We hope that the prices will be attractive enough for farmers to continue betting on garlic cultivation in the future. As far as demand is concerned, it always ends up balancing in the market. There will be no markets out of stock of garlic. »

“There are companies that are already considering switching from processed Chinese garlic to Spanish garlic”
Regarding competition with China, Juan Carlos Navarro asserts that “we are not competing on equal terms. China and Spain have different social, environmental and health concepts. We have markets where consumers prefer our fresh garlic and are willing to bear the incremental cost for these value-added concepts. »

“Although in the area of ​​processed garlic (garlic in paste, frozen and dehydrated) there is unfair competition that harms Spanish garlic. This type of garlic is used in retail, food service and industries, making it difficult for the end consumer to be conscious of what they are consuming. Usually, information on the origin of garlic is not provided to the final consumer and, as a result, they consume products that might not correspond to their preferences and social conscience,” explains the manager of Big Garlic.

“There are some companies that are already considering switching from processed Chinese garlic to Spanish garlic. We hope that this trend will become widespread in the industry and, above all, that legislation will be adopted in this direction to promote transparency towards the end consumer,” emphasizes Juan Carlos Navarro.

For more information :
Juan Carlos Navarro
Big Garlic
Such. : +34 965433127
Cell: +34 609601654
[email protected]
www.big-garlic.com

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