interrogated for 17 hours, he confesses to the murder of his father… still alive

interrogated for 17 hours, he confesses to the murder of his father… still alive
interrogated for 17 hours, he confesses to the murder of his father… still alive

Un ordeal and a false confession. Seven years ago, an American man was charged with the murder of his missing father. Convinced of his guilt, the police in the town of Fontana, near Los Angeles, questioned him for 17 hours, depriving him of sleep. The son, tested, ended up confessing to a murder he had not committed. He has just been compensated nearly $900,000 by the city, as reported The Orange County Register.

In August 2018, Thomas Perez Junior, a resident of the state of California, in the United States, was summoned by the police, even though his father, aged 71, was nowhere to be found. While he explains that the septuagenarian left to walk the dog and never returned, the police do not believe his version.

READ ALSO Torture is not an effective means of pressureDuring the interrogation, the police made him believe that his father’s body had been found and that they had, in their possession, proof of his guilt. For 17 hours, and without sleeping, Thomas Perez Junior will undergo pressure from investigators who get into his head, telling him that some murderers forget having killed. They will go so far as to threaten to euthanize his dog if he does not confess to the murder.

“I have never seen this level of cruelty”

Cornered, despite his innocence, the man ends up admitting and, a few minutes later, attempts suicide with his clothes in the interrogation room. Later that day, her father was finally found alive, he had simply gone to visit friends before picking up his daughter from the airport.

If the news is good for the septuagenarian, the son is traumatized. Her lawyer denounced the “mental torture” through which he had gone and which made her “suicidal”. “In 40 years of trials, I have never seen this level of deliberate cruelty on the part of the police,” he lambasted. While Thomas Perez Junior ended up filing a complaint against the city of Fontana, it compensated him for the incident by nearly $900,000, seven years later.

The judge in charge of the case highlighted deplorable interrogation conditions, also referring to “psychological torture”. “He was deprived of sleep, suffered from mental disorders,” she said. Indeed, at the end of his 17 hours of nightmare, the American was released after three days of psychological observation.

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