A Korean film that will make you think: why should you see Greenhouse in the cinema? – Cinema News

A Korean film that will make you think: why should you see Greenhouse in the cinema? – Cinema News
A Korean film that will make you think: why should you see Greenhouse in the cinema? – Cinema News

Having passed through the Korean Film Festival in Paris in 2023, “Greenhouse” is released in Paris on May 22 (then on the 29th in the rest of France). A first feature film in which the director leaves room for the viewer’s imagination.

What does it talk about ?

A home caregiver, Moon-Jung kindly takes care of an old blind man and his wife. But when a brutal accident separates them, everything blames Moon-Jung. She finds herself having to make an untenable decision.

Sol-hui Lee: first!

Twenty years ago, Park Chan-wook’s Old Boy caused a sensation at the Cannes Film Festival. And went so far as to touch with his fingertips a Palme d’Or that Quentin Tarantino, reluctantly we are told, finally awarded to the documentary Fahrenheit 9/11. But its notoriety went beyond its Grand Prix, to definitively place the Korean thriller on the world map of the 7th Art.

Two decades later, the situation has not changed. Or better. Because Kim Jee-woon is a regular event, Park Chan-wook won a Best Director Award at Cannes with Decision to Leave while Bong Joon-ho won the Palme d’Or ( before an Oscar for Best Picture) thanks to Parasite. Without forgetting Ryoo Seung-wan, author of the impressive Battleship Island, or those more oriented towards drama, like July Jung (About Kim Sohee) or Lee Chang-dong.

Art House

Seo-Hyeong Kim

After three short films made between 2017 and 2021, Sol-hui Lee signs his first feature with Greenhouse, and immediately places himself between the Bong Joon-ho of Parasite, for the social aspect and the subject on relations between classes , and Burning by Lee Chang-dong, which comes to mind when faced with the greenhouse covered with black tarpaulins in which the heroine lives, in order to save money to pay for her future apartment.

All things considered, obviously. On the aesthetic level in particular, or even in the narration, because Greenhouse takes off in the second part, darker and unexpected than the first, more classic but which lays the foundations of this thriller with dramatic accents of which the director had the idea when thinking of the story of his mother, who had taken care of his, then suffering from dementia.

I wanted to explore these murky realities that do exist, even if they go against the idea we have of family.

The feature film thus focuses on the theme of caring for the elderly, which regularly comes up in Korean cinema. While taking care to approach it in a universal way, following a character with murky intentions whose past Sol-hui Lee refuses to tell, to better let the viewer imagine it.

“Members of a family may not be around each other, reject each other, hate each other or want to disappear”she said in the press kit. “I wanted to explore these murky realities that do exist, even if they go against the idea we have of family.” An approach which continues until the final shot, where the filmmaker refuses us the reverse shot in order to let us decide the outcome ourselves.

Sometimes tragic, Greenhouse relies on the mechanisms of the thriller to develop a social discourse around the Korean model, and its director thus gets closer to prestigious authors from her country. Of which she should undoubtedly be part if it confirms the promises glimpsed in this first feature film.

-

-

PREV CHASSAGNE-MONTRACHET: A young man dies in a road accident
NEXT Popular Front: Tribune: “Adrien Quatennens must give up his place to Amy Bah, left-wing feminist”