Volleyball: “In the locker room, they called me the priest”, the former Narbonne player, Ludovic Duée, will enter the Lagrasse Abbey

Volleyball: “In the locker room, they called me the priest”, the former Narbonne player, Ludovic Duée, will enter the Lagrasse Abbey
Volleyball: “In the locker room, they called me the priest”, the former Narbonne player, Ludovic Duée, will enter the Lagrasse Abbey

Narbonne player from 2018 to 2022, and French volleyball champion with Saint-Nazaire last weekend, Ludovic Duée (32 years old) announced the end of his career. And his entry into orders, at the abbey of Lagrasse.

It’s the end of career for Ludovic Duée, 32 years old. Captain of Saint-Nazaire this season, ex-player of Narbonne from 2018 to 2022, and champion of France, he has just announced his entry into orders at Lagrasse Abbey, near Narbonne.

In the Teamand after his title of champion of France, he confided: “I don’t know if I’ll be able to transition easily into this new life, I see it day by day. One of the canons who will be one of my superiors, at the time of the galleys, when I was in between, because I knew the end was approaching, told me “it doesn’t matter, offer all your victories for the glory of God”. It gave me a boost I am delighted to be able to offer this victory for! the glory of God!”

The canons of Lagrasse supporting Ludovic Duée, at the Arena, in Narbonne.
The Independent – Christophe BARREAU

I met Jesus, and I accept it

In the Parisian this Friday, Ludovic Duée goes further and explains his journey: “The real turning point dates from Covid. I was in a tortuous period, I was not very balanced in my life […]. During Covid, I found myself stuck at home. I thought a lot, and I had the chance to meet this religious community by chance. These canons welcomed me with open arms. I thought I saw austere guys, I found young and dynamic guys.”

Canons who, very regularly during his matches at the Arena, came to encourage him.

Ludovic Duée goes further: “I met Jesus, and I embrace it. I am comfortable with my faith. I have my cross with me in the locker room. When people asked me to go out, I accepted, but I warned that I I wouldn’t stay until 6 a.m., otherwise I would be delayed from going to mass the next day.” He continues, still in the columns of Le Parisien: “In the locker room, they nicknamed me the priest.” If he mainly received kindness, he explains that he heard everything: “I was even told ‘We’ll still love you, even if you’ve changed your mind’ or ‘it’s no big deal’, as if it were an illness.”

From now on, the former Centurion, Ludovic Duée, will begin a postulancy and will live with the canons of Lagrasse Abbey, initially in civilian clothes: “If things go well, I will ask to enter the novitiate (test time imposed on novices, editor’s note). I will then be able to take the habit and become a canon like them.”

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