Prepare for Civil Safety Week

Prepare for Civil Safety Week
Prepare for Civil Safety Week
Published on May 2, 2024 at 11:57 a.m.

Update May 3, 2024 at 11:55 a.m.

Emergency Preparedness Week takes place from May 5 to 11, 2024 in Canada. Read the article below to learn how to protect yourself, your family and your community in an emergency.

Emergency Preparedness Week is your opportunity to take action to ensure you are prepared to protect yourself, your family and your community in the event of an emergency. This year, Civil Safety Week takes place from May 5 to 11 with the theme “Be prepared. Know your risks.” Everyone has a role to play in emergency preparedness, so it’s important to understand the risks in your area and learn what actions you can take to protect yourself and your family. Take a look at the list below to learn how you can better prepare for these different types of emergencies.

Forest fires

In Canada, wildfires are common in wooded areas and grasslands from May to September, which can cause significant damage and put lives at risk. Check out the links below to learn what to do before, during and after a wildfire in your area. Before a Wildfire Be sure to protect your home, inform your family, and prepare in the event of a wildfire. During a Wildfire Learn what to do and what not to do if a wildfire approaches your area. After a wildfire Stay calm and assess the situation. Remember that you may encounter dangerous situations, such as downed power lines.

Floods

Flooding is the most common natural hazard in Canada. They can occur at any time of the year and are most often caused by heavy rain, the rapid melting of a thick snowpack, ice jams, or more rarely, the failure of a dam natural or artificial. Check out the links below to learn what to do before, during and after a flood in your area. Before a Flood Be sure to protect your home, inform your family, and prepare in the event of a flood. During a Flood Find out what to do and what not to do if a flood approaches your area. After a Flood Restore your home as soon as possible to protect your health and prevent further damage to the home and its contents.

Extreme cold

Spending time outdoors during the winter season is good for your health and can be a lot of fun. But you need to be aware and prepared for Canada’s cold and severe winter conditions. On average, more Canadians die from exposure to winter cold than from lightning, windstorms and tornadoes combined. When severe winter weather conditions threaten, The Weather Network issues special alerts to inform Canadians in affected areas so they can take steps to protect themselves and their property.

Reduce your risk of frostbite, hypothermia and frostbite by:

  • wearing appropriate clothing;

  • paying attention to weather alerts in your area;

  • finding shelter and staying on the move;

  • winterizing your home;

  • avoiding alcohol.

Earthquakes

In Canada, the coast of British Columbia is the region most exposed to a major earthquake. Other regions prone to earthquakes are the St. Lawrence and Ottawa valleys, as well as parts of Canada’s three territories. Check out the links below to learn what to do before, during and after an earthquake in your area. Before an earthquake During an earthquake After an earthquake

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