AOC Q27G4X test: our full opinion –

The AOC Q27G4X is built around a Fast-IPS panel, now very common in gaming screens. It offers a 27-inch diagonal with QHD definition (2,560 x 1,440 pixels), a maximum refresh rate of 180 Hz, a response time announced at 0.5 ms MPRT (1 ms GtG), or even DisplayHDR 400 certification. .

In short, a monitor like many already exist, with the difference that this one is trading at around 260 euros at the time of writing these lines; a price positioning with little competition on an equal technical sheet, apart from Samsung with the Odyssey G5, and Acer with its Nitro VG271UM3.

AOC Q27G4X datasheet

Model AOC Q27G4X
Dimensions

61.39 cm x 20.77 cm

Screen size

27 inches

Form factor

16:9

Definition

2560 x 1440 pixels

Display frequency

180Hz

Response time

0.5ms

Maximum brightness

450 cd/m²

Number of HDMI ports

2

Number of DisplayPort ports

1

Built-in speakers

No

USB

No

Weight

5.29 kg

Product sheet

The screen was loaned by AOC for this test.

Design: simple as pie

As the entry-level representative of AOC’s catalog, the Q27G4X is a monitor with a simple and clean design, using inexpensive materials. Classic, it is nonetheless modern with a thin frame on three sides, a slightly thicker lower border, and a central support that does not take up too much space on the desk.

Source: Matthieu Legouge

Despite its economical design, AOC’s screen uses plastics that seem sturdy at first glance. The monitor is easy to handle, it is also rather light, and there is no cracking when pressing on the plastics. In short, we are facing a screen of good quality considering the price asked for it.

Source: Matthieu Legouge

Source</a>: Matthieu Legouge

Source: Matthieu Legouge

Connections

In terms of connections, there are no crowds. AOC is content with the bare minimum by offering two HDMI 2.0 ports, a DisplayPort 1.4 and a 3.5 mm mini-jack output, no more. This should nevertheless be sufficient for a majority of players who do not specifically feel the need to connect anything other than their gaming computer. It should also be noted that the screen does not have speakers.

Support

The ergonomics aren’t too bad for a budget monitor. The central support provides perfectly adequate stability to the monitor, while offering enough adjustments to provide a little flexibility in use.

Source</a>: Matthieu Legouge

Source: Matthieu Legouge

Source</a>: Matthieu Legouge

Source: Matthieu Legouge

While occupying a limited space on the desk (approximately 20 cm deep), it makes it possible to tilt, forward and backward, rotate, adjust the height (with 13 cm of amplitude), but also switch to portrait mode. The foot includes a system for passing cables, which is not always very practical despite everything since the opening is offset to the right, as you can see in our images.

Source: Matthieu Legouge

Image: a good image overall, which however lacks accuracy

We generally expect rather poor results when we run our probe on entry-level monitors. Fortunately, this is less and less the case with many references, as manufacturers are aware that providing a correctly calibrated image is still of great importance.

The AOC Q27G4X obviously has some weaknesses, with a slightly too warm color temperature and a red tint visible on the screen, or even a gamma curve which has a little difficulty in matching with the reference curve, leading to grays that appear darker than they should be. Note that our measurements were carried out with the default image mode, that is to say without activating the gaming mode and its “racing”, “FPS”, “RTS”, etc. options.

Although it lacks accuracy overall, we still appreciate a completely correct image, with bright colors, all with good contrast for an IPS panel since the ratio here is 1221:1. Certainly, VA panels do better (let’s not talk about OLED), however we have already seen much worse contrast on entry-level IPS panels like this one.

Brightness remains limited, at 367 cd/m² in this image mode with an SDR signal. However, it is sufficient, unless you have your back directly to a south-facing window, given that the anti-reflective filter plays its role well and correctly dilutes direct reflections.

Delta E SDR

Delta E SDR

Delta E HDR

Delta E HDR

Our measurements show some colorimetric drifts which remain contained. Overall, the colors are respected with an average Delta E of 3.42. The screen also performs much better once an HDR signal is detected. The average Delta E then increases to 2.09, no color shows chromatic drift this time, apart from that observed on white.

Pic lum HDR

HDR Bright Peak

EOTF curve

EOTF curve

DCI-P3

DCI-P3

sRGB

sRGB

Failing to offer backlighting managed by zones and sufficient brightness, this screen offers HDR support which is not of exceptional interest. Certainly, we appreciate being able to take advantage of HDR. The gain in brightness is still notable with a light peak measured at 420 cd/m² and a smoothed curve from 50% luminance.

Source: Matthieu Legouge

In addition, we note interesting colorimetric coverage in the DCI-P3 space, with 93%. Naturally, Rec. 2020 is only 69% covered, which is already not bad. The last point that can cool down is the uniformity of the slab. The Edge-LED backlighting which equips this monitor indeed shows some limitations in displaying homogeneous shades over the entire surface of the screen, we notice this in particular at the four corners of the panel with certain drifts in relation to the center.

Source: Matthieu Legouge

Finally, if there is one thing that is particularly appreciable with this screen, it is to benefit from a QHD definition on 27 inches, where many manufacturers are still content to release affordable models in FHD definition on this same diagonal. . The result is a finer image, pleasant in all situations, even for simple office activities.

Source: Matthieu Legouge

A fluid game without latency, not without ghosting

Regarding performance, the Q27G4X provides solid performance, always taking into account its selling price and comparing it to other references with similar characteristics, often more expensive. Its QHD definition and maximum refresh rate of 180 Hz make it suitable for use with mid-range graphics cards, with which it should not be difficult to run the majority of games at 1440p with constant fluidity.

Source: Matthieu Legouge

AOC announces sufficiently low response times to provide a qualitative gaming experience. In fact, we have sometimes noticed the effects of ghosting on certain competitive games, particularly during our tests on Forza Horizon And Apex Legends. Since the monitor overdrive is not activated by default, it is necessary to browse the OSD and select the options weak Or medium to reduce ghosting.

The result is not perfect in both cases, the ghost image effect on the contours of moving objects is however better controlled by selecting one of these options than by leaving the overdrive deactivated. However, we do not recommend opting for the option strong which this time reveals reverse ghosting.

Source: Matthieu Legouge

We were pleasantly surprised to note that the input lag, the latency between an action and its repercussion on the screen, is at a really low level with only 11.3 ms. This value corresponds to less than one frame of delay compared to a 60 Hz signal, which means you should never experience any latency with this monitor, even at 180 Hz! Be careful, however, to take care that the option Low Input Lag is enabled in the OSD.

Source: Matthieu Legouge

Various options are also included to improve the gaming experience. As on many screens, there are features with various aim indicators or reticles, or to adapt the image depending on the game. The option Shadow Control allows you to brighten an image that is too dark and vice versa. Another option is also duplicated with the latter, it is the Shadow Boost which intervenes on the highlighted areas to try to bring out some details.

Finally, note that we had no problem getting Adaptive-Sync to work. The screen is well recognized as being G-Sync compatible with our gaming computer.

Consumption

The AOC Q27G4X has reasonable power consumption, which is average compared to other more energy-intensive monitors. Calculated according to the surface of the screen by diffusing a white test pattern calibrated at 150 cd/m², in order to obtain a relevant comparative value, the consumption of this screen amounts to 82 W/m².

Price and availability of the AOC Q27G4X

Already available in a good number of stores, the AOC Q27G4X has a major advantage in its favor: its price. Marketed at €269, it comes with a price that is only sixty euros higher than its FHD version.

Where to buy

AOC Q27G4X at the best price?

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