Referendum on motorways, 30 km/h and public transport: the current strong points of the ATE in terms of transport policy

Referendum on motorways, 30 km/h and public transport: the current strong points of the ATE in terms of transport policy
Referendum on motorways, 30 km/h and public transport: the current strong points of the ATE in terms of transport policy

“It is high time to commit to more surface-efficient and environmentally friendly transport,” said Ruedi Blumer, president of ATE. This is why the ATE launched a referendum against the motorway construction frenzy of the Federal Council and Parliament and collected, with a broad alliance, more than 100,000 signatures. “The continued development of motorways is a promotion of individual motorized transport,” laments Ruedi Blumer.

“The additional capacities created immediately generate new incentives, which brings us back more traffic and, more noise, more CO2, more exhaust gases, more tire wear, more accidents, more urban sprawl, more soil waterproofing.” The vote, which will likely take place in November, is a top priority for the ATE.

Do not compromise the successful 30 km/h model

Furthermore, the ATE Steering Committee emphasizes the speed limit of 30 km/h. This achievement must not be sacrificed, declares Isabelle Pasquier-Eichenberger, vice-president of the ATE: “30 km/h is more and more often a quality standard for residential neighborhoods. But the measure has also proven itself when crossing localities.” However, this successful model is regularly called into question and, according to the National Council, the cantons and municipalities should see their decision-making power regarding maximum speed reduced – the speed of 30 km/h for the purposes of protection against Noise should even be completely banned on transit roads.

“The ATE wants the debate to be less ideological and more objective. Cantons and towns must be able to implement appropriate solutions according to the needs of their population and not be prevented from doing so by rigid national regulations,” continues Isabelle Pasquier-Eichenberger. The Council of States will have the opportunity this summer to correct the bad decision of the National Council.

Develop and promote public transport

The third priority of transport policy is the development of public transport, as Bruno Storni, vice-president of the ATE, explains: “Over the coming decades, the Confederation plans to invest more than 35 billion francs in road infrastructure. And for the moment, only 22 billion are planned for the development of the railway infrastructure. Switzerland therefore invests more money in precisely the most polluting means of transport than in the most efficient and environmentally friendly means of transport.

“It is clear that Switzerland’s dependence on motorways must be reduced by readjusting the modal split. We cannot and will not allow ourselves to focus solely on the road.” The ATE believes that action must be taken in particular with regard to Switzerland’s connection to international rail traffic. With good connections to the European rail network, the train is more than just an alternative to flying.


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