Review: “Furiosa” without Max, but to the max

Furiosa (Anya Taylor-Joy) on a vengeful quest.

Warner Bros. Entertainment Switzerland GmbH

Many years had passed for the great return of director George Miller to the universe that made him famous, that of “Mad Max” with a “Fury Road” which easily demonstrated that the Australian had not lost the hand. Thirty years had, however, passed between the opus (and unfortunately not the best) with Mel Gibson (1985) and the one (2015) with Tom Hardy in the title role. And, above all, with Charlize Théron in the role of Furiosa, a character to whom George Miller is now offering a prequel.

Furiosa, in fact, the beauty has gained ground. Miller dedicates an entire film to his origins, without Max, but radically in the post-apocalyptic environment built in “Fury Road”. There we find the Citadel of Immortan Joe, Petroville and the Ball Mill, the three interdependent centers around which all barbaro-economic life revolves.

We also discover, briefly, the famous Green Earth, before it becomes the dead and muddy expanse of “Fury Road”. This is where Furiosa (whom Anya Taylor-Joy gives her youthful features) comes from. It is from there that, as a child, she is kidnapped by the very twisted Dementus (Chris Hemsworth, extremely excellent) and it is thanks to her multiple talents that the taciturn will integrate the kingdom of Immortan Joe (Lachy Hulme) and concoct his terrible revenge.

The program is given. It’s worth what it’s worth, and Miller sticks to his desire to drive Furiosa exactly at the start of “Fury Road.” It will take him almost 2 hours 30 minutes. An objective that King George will once again fulfill with mastery.

The armored truck intended to ensure exchanges between the Citdelle, Petroville and the Ball Mill is back.

The armored truck intended to ensure exchanges between the Citdelle, Petroville and the Ball Mill is back.

Warner Bros. Entertainment Switzerland GmbH

We remain amazed by Miller’s staging, by the elegance of his camera movements, by his art of sliding from a general shot to a close-up, by the beauty of the frames, their virtuosity, their balance. By the readability of its editing, too. We admire all the more that everything seems to flow naturally, that the filmmaker, it seems, only has to bend down to choose the best, without hesitation.

Miller’s style is unique. He was born with “Mad Max” (1979), he exploded with “Mad Max 2, the challenge” (1981), he did not lose an ounce of effectiveness in “Furiosa: A Mad Max Saga” (2024 ). Each of his action films, with the exception of the very sick “Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome” (1985), teaches a lesson to any genius, self-proclaimed or not. And there are countless imitators who have tried to copy the formula while wallowing without hope of redemption.

Chris Hemsworth practically unrecognizable as Dementus.

Chris Hemsworth practically unrecognizable as Dementus.

Warner Bros. Entertainment Switzerland GmbH

In “Furiosa,” there is of course a moment of bravery. A long sequence where everything seems to fit together perfectly. It’s there, it’s big, it’s worth the trip alone. But without crushing the rest; It’s maddening.

We would certainly have preferred that “Furiosa” was a sequel to “Fury Road” and not an episode that comes just before it. The prequels indeed tend to seriously suck the air out of us (a matter of personal taste). No matter, we quibble. It’s like pretending you can hate “Fury Road” because it’s a movie that goes from point A to point B and then just goes back symmetrically to point A. However, this does not prevent us from appreciating the “Furious Route” and, without a doubt, much more than it deserves.

Because what we like about Miller is the form, nothing but the form, all the form. Too bad if, basically, in terms of arrangement and evolution of the universe, the guy stays in his slippers.

-

-

PREV “I could die for him” This new character from the Star Wars series The Acolyte is completely crushing fans
NEXT the film about to enter the history of the platform