Anthony Turgis, analyzing his victory in the 9th stage of the Tour de France: “Like on a chessboard”

Anthony Turgis, analyzing his victory in the 9th stage of the Tour de France: “Like on a chessboard”
Anthony Turgis, analyzing his victory in the 9th stage of the Tour de France: “Like on a chessboard”

“At what point did you say: this step is for me?
It’s funny but you can feel the day coming. I felt it building up. The warm-up, the first pedal strokes, this feeling that we’re not going to miss the race. I watched what was happening. I knew that Mathieu Van Der Poel and Thomas Pidcock were aiming for this kind of stage which are magnificent, designed for us. I took the day in the right direction. I saw a teammate of Van Der Poel anticipating, I told myself that it was the right wave. I followed the right wheels, slipped into the breakaway without having spent too much energy before. As I went on I believed in it, I just had to manage. I felt good but I know that on longer climbs, if it’s really steep, you can get lost at certain times. Once the big difficulties were over I believed in it more and more. My leg pain gradually left me, I just had to manage the end of the race well.

The danger in this kind of ending is to rush?
I pay attention to everything that happens around me, I analyze the other runners a lot, I watch the waves. Yesterday (Sunday) I was aiming for the pure sprint, I tried to engineer everything so that it would come to the sprint as I wanted. The problem was Jasper Stuyven. Before he attacked (10 kilometers from the finish, before the last white path) I turn around, I look at him, he sees very well that I am looking at him because I see the opportune moment to attack. Except that I had just made a fairly violent effort and he really goes for physical. So I let it happen, kept the group at full strength to have as many people as possible to help me achieve my goal, I managed to hold on like that.

“There, on a sprint launched from a little further away, it gave me a considerable advantage. I launch, he can’t overtake me because in fact it’s going fast”

Once in the sprint we say to ourselves: do I have a 50% chance of winning?
I didn’t even put a failure option on the sprint, I bet everything on it. I analyse the race, the others, and for me the best possible option was the sprint. It happens in a group, but it shouldn’t happen in a standing sprint either, because Pidcock is lighter, on a sharper start, he would have been at an advantage. There, on a sprint launched from a little further back, it gave me a considerable advantage. I launch, he can’t overtake me because in fact it goes fast. The whole finale went very well.

Is analyzing everything your way of reassuring yourself?
I love debriefs. Yesterday I watched the video many times, I looked at myself, the why and how I did that. But also the reaction of others, how they position themselves, why they make this choice and not another. Precisely, in a final that’s how I manage to get results in a small group. Why do I watch Stuyven before he attacks, by controlling him, by almost letting him know that I knew he was going to attack: because I have this instinct to attack at opportune moments. Like on a chessboard I advance pawns but I prepare the moves of others. I manage to anticipate, I prepare myself for difficulties, it helps me a lot.

-

-

PREV VIDEO – OM Transfer Market: Mason Greenwood has arrived in Marseille
NEXT Verruyes mayor’s list disowned