Did you notice this inconsistency in the Jurassic Park sequel?

Did you notice this inconsistency in the Jurassic Park sequel?
Did you notice this inconsistency in the Jurassic Park sequel?

If you think it’s incredible that these days the same amount of money is spent promoting movies as it is making them, you’ll be surprised to learn that in 1997, when The Lost World premiered, the Jurassic Park marketing department spent $250 million on merchandise, dolls, video games, and comic books – while the movie only cost $73 million! Fortunately, all of this raised over $600 million – phew, saved!

But apparently the film in question shouldn’t have even existed: Michael Crichton had absolutely no plans to write a sequel to the first Jurassic Park, and it wasn’t until the 1993 film was a success that he dared to start writing a sequel. The contract then stipulated that Steven Spielberg could only direct this sequel if Crichton decided to continue the saga.

A question that remains unanswered

This is how the screenwriter wrote the second part, which however contains a strange plot hole that still leaves fans perplexed decades later. Indeed, at the end of the film, a ghost ship arrives at the port, crashing on the pier, with a T-Rex locked in a cage inside and, presumably, all the crew members dead. But how did they die if the T-Rex was locked?

The answer must surely lie in the early drafts of the script, the most widely circulated fan theory…

Read more on AlloCiné

Jurassic Park: 31 years later, developers ruin the film by analyzing the source code of the villain’s computer!

Jurassic Park 4: What was Steven Spielberg’s cancelled film supposed to be about?

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