Looks, bounces and fluidity at the Belle Scène Saint-Denis

Looks, bounces and fluidity at the Belle Scène Saint-Denis
Looks, bounces and fluidity at the Belle Scène Saint-Denis

“We have one week to make our voices heard”

Before the program, consisting of three shows, begins, Emmanuelle Jouan arrives on stage with Agathe Pfauwadel, Aëla Labbé, Mélanie Perrier and Amala Dianor. She speaks: “We are not going to act as if nothing is happening in this country. I wanted to share with you our deep concern and emotion. I am the director of a dance convention scene in Seine-Saint-Denis, we are obviously a public theater supported by all the public support we need to provide this support to choreographers. (…) We are a tiny part of the ecosystem of the public service of art and culture, and we know that we are in the crosshairs of a party which, whatever it may say, is not a party like the others. La Belle Scène Saint-Denis is a crazy, experimental project, resulting from an ambitious cultural policy in favor of choreographic art. “In doing so, she sums up what the Belle Scène Saint-Denis is and announces, without wanting to, the line of this morning with its perfect progression and construction.

AC/DC or the bells of hell

AC/DC opens the morning ball. It is 10 o’clock, the mistral is blowing very hard. They enter through the door of the beautiful building that surrounds the stage. The young Jules Lebel on one side and Stéphane Imbert, the oldest, on the other, go about their business. Stéphane builds fragile foundations and Jules places a vinyl on a record player. 10 o’clock. He swings Hells Bells of the group AC/DC, of ​​which he is a huge fan. In a reference to Shirtology by Jérôme Bel (no, no pun intended here!), Jules removes one by one the ten or so band T-shirts he has accumulated. The image is funny. The dance arrives in a pas de deux that leaves room for active listening from one to the other. Who is carrying who? Who is leaning on whom? Jules is a dancer at the IME in Château-Thierry, Stéphane has been dancing for forty years. Today, they do the same job. Standing, their bodies leaning, they only hold on if the other holds on. AC/DC is also a real term, meaning “alternating current/direct current”. Here, otherness is gained in continuity, in a moment as gentle as it is strong.

The bell of paradise

Another show, another bell, this time in the singular. And a real one, on stage. In reality, a gong. A beautiful, well-gilded one. Thierry Balasse plugs in (yes, a gong can be plugged in!) and seeks silence before the hammering. Marie Barbottin, Pep Garrigues, Claire Malchrowicz, Jérémy Martinez, Bérangère Roussel are hyper chic in gauze blouses and wide black Bermuda shorts. Mélanie Perrier’s pieces are always chic in form and content. She cultivates detail and, as in AC/DClistening. With Until we jump togetherfrom which she presents an excerpt, the title sets the tone. Yes, we will jump together, but before, what happens before? Well, we get into a circle, we lift our heels on demi-pointe and we come back down, and we start again to the sound of the gong that enters us. The movement occurs in a metronomic release of the arm that dissonates. The lines are woven in a dazzling way, in a form of sensitive geometry. The glances are exchanged between the performers who choose to enter into counterpoints. They are the bells that twirl without ever being able to detach themselves from their base, stuck for eternity to their building. The building for Mélanie is the body and she takes care of it, extremely care, so that everyone is in tune with a vibrant unison. It is sublime.

The fluidity of the earth

For the last proposal of the morning, we discover M&M by the famous Amala Dianor. This is another pas de deux, this time feminine. Marion Alzieu and Mwendwa Marchand attack the dance, they slide deep, send their hips to fairly fast electro music. As for AC/DC and for Until we jump togetherthe key to the movement is in listening. The writing remains hip-hop, they come to find their feet with the flat of their hand, break the necks, but they move away from the urban exercise. Amala goes here even more in the contemporary. It offers Mwendwa Marchand the chance to shine in other tessituras. We feel in her the ballroooms and Indian dance. She dances like one devours a meal when one is starving, she swallows the stage. Her fluidity takes hold of each of her muscles in a mobile pelvis that invades you. This resonates perfectly with the more contemporary lines of Marion Alzieu.

A magnificent program, therefore, with perfect coherence!

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