Guy Bertrand, “the ayatollah of language” at Radio-Canada, retires

Guy Bertrand, “the ayatollah of language” at Radio-Canada, retires
Guy Bertrand, “the ayatollah of language” at Radio-Canada, retires

At 70, his eyes still shine like a child’s. Guy Bertrand, the “Ayatollah of Language” at Radio-Canada, as his colleagues affectionately call him, is retiring on Friday with a sense of duty accomplished.

His voice and his tone, the nuances of the French language that he highlights, particularly in The linguistic capsulehave left their mark on generations of listeners in Quebec and elsewhere in French-speaking Canada.

Guy Bertrand joined Radio-Canada to replace him for a few months; it was only more than 33 years later that he left the public broadcaster.

november1936. I was there for about 38% of the life of the public broadcaster”,”text”:”Radio-Canada has existed since November 2, 1936. I was there for about 38% of the life of the public broadcaster”}}”>Radio-Canada has existed since November 2, 1936. I have been there for approximately 38% of the life of the public broadcasterlikes to recall this trained translator.

We didn’t speak the same French as today

When he arrived at Radio-Canada in 1991, we didn’t speak the same French as todayunderlines the first advisor and linguistic columnist, taking care not to say whether it was better or not.

Radio-Canada, being public, must reflect the society it serves. And the diversity of its audiences is fascinating.

A quote from Guy Bertrand, first advisor and linguistic columnist at Radio-Canada

He says he understands that the language used, particularly in the information, may have seemed somewhat elitist. But he maintains that the public broadcaster has made great efforts to be accessible to its audience, without sacrificing the quality of the spoken or written language.

Radio-Canada has adapted to its audiences, as was the case for many media outlets around the world, likes to point out the man who also worked as an advisor for Le Robert, publisher of the famous dictionary.

: people had an on-air performance, an official tone. But over time, a conviviality was established […] Radio-Canada was of its time”,”text”:”In the past, Radio-Canada had a different level of language: people had an on-air performance, an official tone. But over time, a conviviality was established […] Radio-Canada was of its time”}}”>In the past, Radio-Canada had a different level of language: people had an on-air performance, an official tone. But over time, a conviviality was established […] Radio-Canada was of its timehe testifies.

Now we’re starting to speak informally, something that was unimaginable when I arrived here.confides this guardian of the language.

Open in full screen mode

Guy Bertrand, who is retiring after 33 years of service at Radio-Canada, emphasizes that the Internet has brought French-speaking communities together.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Ivanoh Demers

I have no worries about French

Optimistic, Guy Bertrand says he does not give in to the fear of seeing the French language disappear in the English-speaking ocean that surrounds it.

I have no worries. I think the French language has survived in French Canada since 1634, there is a good chance it will be able to last a good few hundred years.

A quote from Guy Bertrand, first advisor and linguistic columnist at Radio-Canada

The Internet has brought French-speaking communities closer together, he notes.

1960″,”text”:”We hear French people in Paris using Quebecois expressions on occasion, which was unthinkable in the 1960s”}}”>We hear French people in Paris using Quebecois expressions on occasion, which was unthinkable in the 1960sillustrates Mr. Bertrand.

The banishment of words scares me

He welcomes the exchanges and the quality of communication between French speakers across the planet.

But Guy Bertrand does not appreciate political correctness And the banishment of wordsreferring to the debate that has rocked the world in recent years regarding the n-word. It scares mehe said, deploring the fact thatwe censor ourselves a lot.

But this does not shake his confidence in the future. He says he is leaving peacefully, after having given more than three decades of his life to an adventure that has never disappointed him.

-

-

PREV A custom drone show in Sudbury
NEXT Sochaux (Friendly): at what time and on which TV channel to watch the match?