Volunteers’ Day: the ADMR of Moselle deplores “a lack of awareness of the issue of isolation”

Volunteers’ Day: the ADMR of Moselle deplores “a lack of awareness of the issue of isolation”
Volunteers’ Day: the ADMR of Moselle deplores “a lack of awareness of the issue of isolation”

The ADMR of Moselle is organizing a day this Tuesday in tribute to its volunteers, who support isolated people in the department on a daily basis. The network of associations still has difficulty attracting younger people into personal assistance.

“We really wanted to say thank you to them for their commitment and their vocation to help people”, explains Marion Kuntzburger, development manager at the ADMR of Moselle, guest of France Bleu Lorraine, Tuesday June 18. The network of personal assistance associations brings together around fifty volunteers in Marsal, Tuesday, to pay tribute to them and bring them together. On a daily basis, they participate in home visits for isolated people, but they also make themselves available to take them to their medical appointments, do shopping, etc.

“We have citizen teams that are formed, with two or three people to visit,” she continues. “It ranges from one to two visits per week, but it depends on the availability of volunteers and the needs of isolated people. We have some, for example, who simply prefer to have a phone call from time to time, and not receive visits .And vice versa!”

Succeeding in managing “emotional distance”

At the ADMR, volunteers have on average 60 years, “both young retirees and people who have been retired for several years”specifies Marion Kuntzburger. “We also have volunteers who are involved and who may be around twenty years old, but this will more concern senior civic solidarity services. We still have difficulty recruiting young volunteers.”

“There is a lack of awareness about the issue of isolation,” justifies the development manager of the ADMR. “Several events, such as heatwaves or the Covid-19 crisis, have reminded us that these people are isolated and need support. But mentalities are changing and volunteering is changing. The search for profit can be -be a little stronger. So we have to rebuild this momentum of solidarity, it involves daily immersions with these people, to realize what volunteering is.”

During this day of meetings with volunteers, the objective is also to allow them to talk about their experience. “We often hear the question of emotional distance, particularly grief support when people have just lost their spouse”, she says. “We very quickly take up a lot of space in a person’s life. For them, this routine is very important. But volunteers also have daily activities, a job, a family. So you have to protect yourself and protect others.”

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