The revival of the “quaver style”

At 7 years old, young Simara is withdrawn by nature.

Despite his young age, the child has already experienced many disturbing events. My parents had drug and alcohol problemsshe confides.

Simara Wilson finds herself in foster care with her younger brother. However, a few months later, they separated. The latter will be placed with another family, where he was really mistreatedshe says, holding back her tears.

I’m the eldest in the family, so I felt [responsable]. I am like a second mother to my siblings. »

A quote from Simara Wilson

Being uprooted from her biological family and being separated from her brother disturbs her.

At that time, to bring a little sweetness into his daily life, his host family went every Sunday to his host grandfather, a fiddler. He livens up family gatherings with his reels, mixed-race musical pieces.

I remember very well seeing his violin in the case, and listening to him while he playedsays Simara, describing these musical sessions as a first Source of inspiration.

Simultaneously, at the primary school, the violinist Linda Duford teaches with the Kole Crook Fiddle Association (there KCFAKole Crook Fiddle Association) the Métis violin to elementary school students. Curious, Simara goes to join the group, which meets after school.

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Simara feels at ease in school corridors, where she herself learned to play the Métis violin at the age of 7. Photo: Radio-Canada / Julie Plourde

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  • Image 1 of 3: SImara plays the violin, from behind, in the school corridor. Simara feels at ease in school corridors, where she herself learned to play the Métis violin at the age of 7. Photo: Radio-Canada / Julie Plourde.>>
  • Image 2 of 3: Simara and Linda hold their violin, sitting side by side. “Simara has such an endearing soul, she is such a caring, caring person,” says Linda Duford who took Simara under her wing. Photo: Radio-Canada / Julie Plourde.>>
  • Image 3 of 3: SImara looks at her violin, which has an engraving on it, in front of a mural by artist John Rombough on the school wall. It was thanks to Linda Duford and the KCFA that Simara obtained her violin with the engraving of an Inuk fisherman on the sound box, a handmade instrument worth $3,000. She nicknamed her violin “Benjamin”. Photo: Radio-Canada / Julie Plourde.>SImara looks at her violin, which has an engraving on it, in front of a mural by artist John Rombough on the school wall.>

At first I was skeptical and wondered if it was for me, but I really liked it, and kept goingremembers the young woman. I was hungry to learn something new, and this instrument really caught my attention.

Simara Wilson made a strong impression on Linda Duford.

She was the shyest, the most discreet. She didn’t even look at people. She was so shy and right away I thought she was in a foster home, which turned out to be true. I knew she was going through difficultiesremembers the vice-president of the KCFAKole Crook Fiddle Association.

Simara continued the lessons, learning Métis fiddle, the style of music of her Métis and Dene ancestors. It took her at least two years to overcome her shyness. […] But she kept coming back and we really supported hersays Linda, diving back into her memories.

These workshops also allowed the young fiddler and Linda to form a strong friendship.

>>Portrait of Linda Duford and Simara Wilson.>>
Linda Duford and Simara Wilson have been accomplices for several years.
Photo: Radio-Canada / Julie Plourde

When I was in high school, I suffered from social anxiety. It really had an impact on my mental health and my health in general. But when I play music, it heals me. It’s like the drumming and dancing in my Dene culture. The sound of the drum brings healingsays the young woman.

Simara Wilson does not hesitate to say that the violin, the KCFAKole Crook Fiddle Association and Linda gave him a purpose in life.

Now enrolled in this association’s teaching program, Simara hopes to pursue a career teaching Métis violin.

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