The Charente Nature chronicle: the two-tailed Pasha, a climatic migrant?

The Charente Nature chronicle: the two-tailed Pasha, a climatic migrant?
The Charente Nature chronicle: the two-tailed Pasha, a climatic migrant?

He is the two-tailed Pasha. It is a day butterfly that we also know under the name Jason or Strawberry Nymphale. This lepidopteran has an imposing size, which can exceed 10 cm in wingspan in females. This allows it to move over long distances and at altitude thanks to rapid and particularly powerful flight. It is the largest butterfly in Europe.

The editorial team advises you

A butterfly lover… of alcohol

The Two-tailed Pasha appreciates the woodlands and dense thickets typical of the Mediterranean region. It is a territorial butterfly which does not tolerate the presence of conspecifics. He sits high up to monitor the surroundings and as soon as an intruder enters his field of vision, he chases him. Pacha particularly likes ripe fruits at the advanced stage of fermentation. This butterfly does not forage for nectar, it focuses on fermented peaches, grapes and figs, its favorite meal. Another particularity of its diet, it also appreciates alcoholic drinks as well as carrion and animal excrement!

The Pasha has two generations per year, one in June and the other at the end of summer, the latter being much more abundant. This is explained by the fact that the caterpillar which is born in September is much more likely to die before reaching its final stage. It must in fact spend the winter in this form before transforming in May, and the cold is often fatal to it.

Its reproduction follows a classic cycle. After fertilization, the female looks for an arbutus tree to lay her eggs. It recognizes this plant thanks to receptors located on its front legs. After 10 to 15 days of incubation the caterpillar appears. It measures on average 5 mm and has an astonishing particularity: it is like wearing a helmet with four horns. After six weeks and the fifth and final molt, the caterpillar suspends to transform into a chrysalis.

As its name suggests, the caterpillar’s host plant is the arbutus tree. With the changing climate, this is undoubtedly what facilitated its arrival in New Aquitaine, arbutus trees being planted more and more often in our region.

#French

-

-

PREV Ontario issues rules for Sarnia plastics plant that emits benzene
NEXT atuvu.ca