A phenomenon which excites, which challenges and which makes people cringe more than ever in Senegal

A phenomenon which excites, which challenges and which makes people cringe more than ever in Senegal
A phenomenon which excites, which challenges and which makes people cringe more than ever in Senegal

Homosexuality or “Gorjigen” in Senegal is once again resurfacing in the public arena. Considered a crime in the collective conscience of the Senegalese citizen, homosexuality continues to be experienced in Senegal. Despite the diplomatic firmness of our leaders in front of their hosts: (Macky in front of Trudeau, Obama and on a French TV, Sonko in front of Mélenchon), unnatural practices continue to progress in Senegal in the face of the helplessness of the populations who continue to denounce. We remember Maniang Kassé considered the first Senegalese homo known to everyone. But for 20 years, that is to say since complete liberalism, associations of all kinds have begun to emerge and the Ministry of the Interior has registered movements with a social aim, but which flirt with homosexuality… We do not won’t give a name, but they exist galore. However, in court hearings, we witness the sentencing of people arrested for unnatural acts.

Note that the international community places the LGBTI+ (Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex) cause at the center of its priorities. She introduced this cause into her fight for minority rights. A question strongly criticized by the overwhelming majority in Senegal, all faiths combined.
Thus, President Macky Sall, for the first time, spoke about it officially in front of the former American president in Dakar, Barack Obama. Newly elected President of the Republic of Senegal, he responded to a dig launched by his American counterpart in June 2013. “Fundamentally, it is a social question. There cannot be a fixed model in all countries. Cultures are different, as are religions and traditions. The decriminalization of homosexuality is like the death penalty, opinions are divided on this. We have abolished the death penalty years ago in Senegal, but other countries have not,” he pointed out in the face of an American journalist who asked the question.

As if President Sall’s response was not clear to the ears of the French who want its legalization in Senegal no matter what, he is still asked the same question. Still standing straight, President Sall, during a visit to France in 2015, was this time questioned on the iTélé set about Senegal’s refusal to decriminalize homosexuality. His answer is unequivocal. “In the name of what, because homosexuality is decriminalized elsewhere, should this be a universal law? We have homosexuals in our house. Associations have no difficulties with the government, but will they not have difficulties with society? That’s another matter. People must have the modesty to understand that all countries are not the same, do not have the same histories, do not have the same developments,” President Sall will respond.

A similar response served by the president of the ruling party, Ousmane Sonko, Thursday May 16, 2024 to his host also, Jean-Luc Mélenchon at Cheikh Anta Diop University in Dakar. “If the phenomenon is not accepted in Senegal, it is tolerated and the greatest danger that the members of this community can incur is the propaganda that they want to impose on us because since the dawn of time, societies have lived with these phenomena and there has never been persecution either here in Senegal or anywhere in Africa. Each people has experienced these behaviors until they found semantic concordances. Here in Senegal, we say gorjigen. We managed it and we continue to manage it in our own way and according to our socio-cultural realities. For these considerations, we for once call on the Western world to respect, reciprocity and tolerance. We too have our way of life. A way of life cannot be uniform or universal. They must suffer from a few exceptions here and there. Regarding this phenomenon, Senegal and many African countries cannot accept any desire to demand the legalization of this phenomenon…” responded the leader of Pastef.

President Macky Sall was questioned again by a journalist on Wednesday February 12, 2020 during the visit of the gay Canadian Prime Minister to Dakar. Here too, bluntly, he retorts: “The laws of our country obey standards which are the summary of our values ​​of culture and civilization. This has nothing to do with homophobia. Those who have a sexual orientation of their choice are not subject to exclusion. » The answer not being clear in the conscience of a journalist, the latter bounced back by saying that how the ban on homosexuality is not homophobia. The president gets annoyed and responds dryly: “We cannot ask Senegal to say: ‘Tomorrow, we legalize homosexuality, and tomorrow, it’s the gay parade.’ That is not possible because our society does not accept it. Society will evolve, it will take as long as it takes. Each country has its own metabolism,” he answers.

In any case, the answers seem to be clear on Senegal’s refusal to legalize homosexuality which is radically and literally banned by Senegalese society, to which must be added the Muslim religions and Catholicism. Senegal is not an atheist country, its population bans unnatural practices…

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