Spring cleaning in the streets of Mani-utenam

Armed with rakes and bags, the citizens of Mani-utenam come together to restore the beauty of the community. The Uashat mak Mani-utenam band council is organizing a cleaning chore for the first time this weekend, which attracts several dozen participants.

Under the sun and the heat, the cleaning chore has the feel of a neighborhood party.

People parade, by car, on four wheels or on foot, to exchange their bags of waste for raffle tickets.

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Participant Réal Thériault will donate the money from the cans collected to the Élyme des sables palliative care home.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Michèle Bouchard

Responsible for the event, the director of infrastructure, fixed assets and housing, Thérèse-Ambroise Rock, notes the enthusiasm of the citizens. It seems like people couldn’t wait. They were there early, asking us for bags. Everyone is cheerful and cares about the communityshe says.

Adults are happy to teach young people the importance of taking care of the environment, and children are eager to free the streets and green spaces of their waste.

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The director of infrastructure, fixed assets and housing, Thérèse-Ambroise Rock, encourages people to look for the best places to clean.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Michèle Bouchard

These are things that will remain in nature for years. We want people to be aware of this, and young people, just as much.mentions Thérèse Ambroise-Rock.

Like young Nitei and his friends, who already know that they must take care of their community. Because it’s not good to throw away, it’s pollution. It’s not good for the earthexplains Nitei.

>>Three children hug each other.>>

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Nitei (left) and his friends participate in the chore with great enthusiasm.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Michèle Bouchard

The garbage that littered the streets heads to the containers, and the cans are carefully collected by Réal Thériault.

He shows up at the biggest events in Sept-Îles to collect the cans, then deposit them, in order to donate the money raised to the Élyme des sables palliative care home.

>>Réal Thériault is standing outside.>>

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Réal Thériault donated $70,000 to Élyme des sables last year, thanks to the countless cans he collected.

Photo: Radio-Canada / Michèle Bouchard

After a weekend of beautifying the streets of Mani-utenam, the event will move to Uashat on May 18 and 19, and next year, throughout the city of Sept-Îles, hopes the organizer.

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