(VIDEO and PHOTOS) The Northern Lights offer a magical night: breathtaking images from the Charentais

An “extreme” solar storm, the first of this level since 2003, hit the Earth this Friday evening and during the night from Friday to Saturday, generating impressive northern lights.

This is a level 5 geomagnetic storm, the maximum level on the scale used according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The phenomenon magnified the sky, gave it shades of pink and purple and generated quite incredible light.

This Saturday, May 11, many CL readers have already sent us their photos. They are wonderful. Here are some of the photos that reached us. We are amazed.

In the sky over Angoulême, Adeline Dupuy took impressive photos.


  • The Angoulême ordeal under an extraordinary sky

    Aurore Dupuy


  • Angouleme

    Aurore Dupuy

  • In Angoulême


    In Angoulême

    Aurore Dupuy

In Mornac, Nicolas Suanez did not miss this moment. “It was midnight. The strongest of the solar storm, he explains.

  • Extraordinary color gradient


    Extraordinary color gradient

    Nicholas Suanez

  • Extraordinary color gradient


    Extraordinary color gradient

    Nicholas Suanez

Photos, and even a video. Amateur astronomer Eric Barbotin sent us the video of all the images that were taken between 12:05 a.m. and 1:41 a.m., during the night from Friday to Saturday, by the full-sky camera of the Grande Vallée observatory, near Mainfonds. .

In Nersac, Pierre Massif spent a long time outside to capture these wonderful colors.

  • In Nersac


    In Nersac

    Pierre Massif

  • In Nersac


    In Nersac

    Pierre Massif

  • In Nersac


    In Nersac

    Pierre Massif

In Douzat, Nicolas Mérignac was enthusiastic. “The auroras were visible to the naked eye.”

  • The sky of Douzat.


    The sky of Douzat.

    Nicolas Mérignac

  • The sky of Douzat.


    The sky of Douzat.

    Nicolas Mérignac

In Charmant, Stéphanie Massif produced a series of photos which reveal a multitude of colors depending on the moment of the solar storm. Impressive.

  • To Charming.


    To Charming.

    Stephanie Massif

  • Charming.


    Charming.

    Stephanie Massif

  • To Charming.


    To Charming.

    Stephanie Massif

  • To Charming.


    To Charming.

    Stephanie Massif

In Ruelle-sur-Touvre, Sébastien Surget did not go to bed very early. And he does not regret having kept watch…

In Ruelle.


In Ruelle.

Sébastien Surget

In Champniers, Karim Abdul Jabbar was in the front row, “with my iPhone 14”.

  • The sky of Champniers.


    The sky of Champniers.

    Karim Abdul Jabbar

  • The sky of Champniers.


    The sky of Champniers.

    Karim Abdul Jabbar

  • The sky of Champniers.


    The sky of Champniers.

    Karim Abdul Jabbar

In Angoulême, Tristan Cossemont: “I am stunned”.

  • Fascinating spectacle. In Angoulême.


    Fascinating spectacle. In Angoulême.

    Tristan Cossemont

  • Angouleme.


    Angouleme.

    Tristan Cossemont

On the heights of Chatignac, in southern Charente, this CL reader, also a photographer at night, did not miss the spectacle.

Chatignac, around 1 a.m., during the night from Friday to Saturday.


Chatignac, around 1 a.m., during the night from Friday to Saturday.

Emmanuelle Salvatore Villain

La Couronne, 1 a.m., during the night from Friday to Saturday.

The crown


The crown

Olivier Rousselot.

In Bignac, Mike Sattler’s photo looks like an impressionist painting

In Bigac


In Bigac

Mike Sale

In Yviers, Rémi Desaix was outside, camera in hand when the phenomenon occurred.

In Yviers.


In Yviers.

Rémi Desaix

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), “GPS, power grids, spacecraft, satellite navigation and other technologies may have been affected” by the solar phenomenon.

This storm is caused by the arrival on Earth of a series of coronal mass ejections from the Sun. These are “explosions of energetic particles and magnetic fields coming from the sun,” explained Shawn Dahl, of the Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC), at a press conference Friday afternoon. NOAA.

The last event reaching this level 5 was in October 2003, an episode nicknamed “the Halloween storms,” the agency wrote. At the time, power outages occurred in Sweden and transformers were damaged in South Africa, she said.

The storm is expected to continue through the weekend, with the arrival of additional coronal mass ejections.

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