Naval Québec in Finland: looking for knowledge and partnerships

The economic mission led by Naval Québec in Finland is coming to an end, but it could be a sign of a new beginning for several Quebec companies.

In Northern Europe since Monday, around forty entrepreneurs from the Canadian maritime industry, including 25 from Quebec, are visiting Finnish shipyards and suppliers specializing in shipbuilding.

Their objective; create agreements between companies from the two countries and draw inspiration from Finnish expertise.

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The visiting delegation at Aalto University, which is conducting navigation tests in simulated polar conditions.

Photo: Facebook / Naval Quebec

A partnership between Naval Québec, formerly the Davie Canada Shipyard Suppliers Association, and Finnish Maritime Industries has even been created, according to a press release issued earlier this week. It should be concluded by June 15 and aims to enhance skills development, knowledge transfer and capacity building to meet changing industry demandswe write.

It’s overflowing. There are some amazing ideas here for our entrepreneurs. There are examples to follow. We realize that in Finland, the shipbuilding ecosystem is extremely tight-knit. Everyone knows each other. This means that there is a lot of mutual assistance between the construction sites and members of the supply chain.says the president and CEO of Naval Québec, Pierre Drapeau in an interview on the show First hour.

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View of part of the Davie construction site, during maintenance work (archive photo)

Photo: Radio-Canada / Marc Godbout

According to him, the development of business ties could improve the service offering of Quebec companies. This could ensure that the ships that we have to produce in Canada as part of the National Shipbuilding Strategy are produced on time, on cost and with an excessively high level of quality.

Chantier Davie, in Lévis, was integrated into the Strategy in April 2023. It should thus have access to contracts worth several billion dollars. The company also acquired the Finnish shipyard Helsinki Shipyard Oy (HSO), a major icebreaker manufacturer, at the end of 2023.

It is to the advantage of the Davie shipyard that a group of companies come here to strengthen their knowledge and when Davie or other shipyards have calls for tenders to be made, they will be able to find Quebec companies which will meet their needs

A quote from Pierre Drapeau, President and CEO of Naval Québec

Taking inspiration from Finland to fill gaps here

Canadian shipbuilding yards often have to turn abroad to obtain certain products and services, because the domestic supply chain does not meet demands, indicates Pierre Drapeau, regarding navy ships.

In the case of icebreakers, he believes the challenge is less great. Technologically, it is a little less complex than the navy and we have more potential suppliers. Finland is a champion in building icebreakers, so when you come here you meet people who know about it.he clarified.

>>Port of Helsinki.>>

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The port of Helsinki, Finland (archive photo).

Photo: Radio-Canada / Olivier Lemieux

GDP in Finland”,”text”:”It’s very inspiring for our entrepreneurs who come here to learn and build business ties because here, in Canada and Quebec, we have companies looking for information and who want to develop their expertise like here. The naval sector is an important part of the GDP in Finland”}}”>It’s very inspiring for our entrepreneurs who come here to learn and build business ties because here, in Canada and Quebec, we have companies looking for information and who want to develop their expertise like here. The naval sector is an important part of the GDP in Finlandexplains Mr. Drapeau.

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