Swiss start-up Mimic wants to transform the industry with its robotic hand driven by GenAI

Swiss start-up Mimic wants to transform the industry with its robotic hand driven by GenAI
Swiss start-up Mimic wants to transform the industry with its robotic hand driven by GenAI

The Zurich start-up Mimic announces a fundraising of 2.5 million dollars to develop advanced technologies for robotic arms and hands integrating generative AI.

An ETH spin-off, Mimic announces that it has completed a $2.5 million funding round for the development of its robotic arm and humanoid hand technologies associated with generative AI. In its announcement, the young company explains that it is developing humanoid robotic hands that are agile and easily integrated into existing manual workflows.

Mimic devices are trained based on human demonstrations, allowing them to understand and imitate observed behaviors. On its website, Mimic specifies that its robotic hands are trained from videos of humans. This approach differs from traditional robotic solutions, which are typically designed for specific use cases, requiring expensive engineering and many pre-programmed movements. There are currently no plans to develop complete humanoids. “Most use cases are stationary and do not require a full humanoid robot with legs. This is why we are focusing our ingenuity in data collection and hardware on a universal robotic hand compatible with industrial robotic arms available on the market for packaging,” explains Stephan-Daniel Gravert, co-founder of the company.

According to the start-up, their goal is to help alleviate global labor shortages by deploying its robots in industries where repetitive tasks require complex motor skills but are difficult to automate.

The Zurich start-up team set out to develop its own LLM model for robotic manipulation. The aim here is to ensure that robots are able to “reason and understand the physical world”, says the Mimic announcement. Before pointing out that as a result, robots can perform tasks with minimal demonstrations and without requiring expensive and complicated programming for each new task. The interface doped with GanAI thus makes it possible to control the robot simply with orders in natural language.

Mimic has reportedly already been approached by a large number of initial customers, including supermarkets, industrial bakeries, as well as pharmaceutical manufacturing, recycling and laboratory automation companies.

The market for companies specializing in AI and humanoid robotics is booming. Particularly with Figure or Covariant, which develops a model that can self-learn from the physical world. According to Goldman Sachs, the global market for humanoid robots could reach $38 billion by 2035.

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