Media – Despite a jump in the world ranking: Senegal falls on the security score – Lequotidien

Media – Despite a jump in the world ranking: Senegal falls on the security score – Lequotidien
Media – Despite a jump in the world ranking: Senegal falls on the security score – Lequotidien

In Senegal, journalists are not safe. This is what emerged from the report published yesterday by Reporters Without Borders (Rsf) on press freedom in the world. If Senegal has jumped 10 places in the world ranking on press freedom, it is far from being a good student on the issue of journalist safety. According to the Rsf report, it fell 13 places this year. A fall which is partly explained by the events which have punctuated the political life of the country in recent years.

By Justin GOMIS – Senegal has no reason to boast about its rank. Its global ranking for press freedom around the world is nothing more than a sham. According to the Reporters Without Borders (Rsf) 2024 report, made public yesterday on the occasion of the celebration of World Press Freedom Day, it experienced an increase in positioning on the ranking of 10 points. Ranked in 104th position in 2023, it occupies 94th position in 2024. But this increase is compromised by its low score in terms of security of media and journalists, which fell by 13 points.

“In terms of analysis, we wanted to explain in the ranking, a sort of trompe-l’oeil increase which confirms that the security issue of the media and journalists is still important. We saw in the monitoring that we did and the analyzes that we also received from our respondents that the security score given to Senegal is a very low score, so much so that the country fell by 13 places. It can be quite paradoxical to have an increase in position and see a decrease in score. But this is what we must remember. This is the most important in terms of advocacy and the Constitution as well. This is an important dynamic for the promotion of press freedom. We call it a sham increase, as is the case with Guinea,” explained Sadibou Marong, head of Rsf’s sub-Saharan Africa network.

According to him, “real issues, such as the safety of journalists, are still important in the country.” This is evidenced by the political events that the country has experienced and during which journalists, left to their own devices, have not benefited from a favorable environment to practice their profession.

Descent into hell
“In 2023, there have been almost a dozen cases that we have worked on and we have shown that there are also attacks on journalists and reporters, including women. We have seen media suspensions for a month. We also saw journalists and press groups, like Walf, who were particularly targeted. We saw the internet outages which prevented journalists from being able to go live whenever they wanted. All this impacted their work,” listed Sadibou Marong, according to whom Senegal must once again become the flagship of press freedom that it once was. “This is a country that, over the last ten years, has fundamentally fallen. And this is serious for a country which, in West Africa, has wavered between 36th and 46th position. But in recent years, we have also seen that it is a sort of descent into hell. This does not promote freedom of the press,” he lamented.

Addressing the new Senegalese authorities, the former head of the Economics Desk of the daily Le Soleil invites them to “consider the new classification of Senegal as a sort of Wake-up call for the media, the corporation of journalists in general , and beyond that freedom of the press.” Given the astonishing sights of reporters being beaten by security forces, the support of politicians who took them to task, and the threats that emerged last year, Reporters Without Borders believes that we must move beyond this.

And to do this, this organization, which works for the protection and well-being of journalists, has made recommendations. “The authorities must put in place a security system for journalists. It is important that every time there are journalists who are attacked or threatened, that there is the possibility of putting this system into action. Then there is the question of media economics. In our monitoring, we often realize that the countries which are making the most progress are countries where the media are in a fairly favorable economic environment. (…),” he said, without forgetting the law on access to information. For him, this law must be of public interest so that it can allow all citizens, including journalists, to access information of public interest.
[email protected]

-

-

PREV in Dordogne and Gironde, the words of breeders from Drôme who face the wolf
NEXT a slight increase, but businesses better protected