Disability: Nova Scotia adopts standardized forms

Disability: Nova Scotia adopts standardized forms
Disability: Nova Scotia adopts standardized forms

While some provinces say they are taking steps to help doctors and health care providers complete paperwork, theCanadian Life and Health Insurance Association (HACCA) says it too is working to ease this burden. To this end, CLHIA member insurers in Nova Scotia have adopted the professional association’s model form for applications for short-term disability and long-term disability benefits.

“CLHIA members have agreed to accept a single model form for short-term and long-term disability insurance. “, wrote the CLHIA in a press release dated April 25, 2024. “We invite other provinces to do the same,” declares the association regarding adoption in Nova Scotia.

Design of alternative diets

CLHIA says technology, over time, will also help reduce the administrative burden faced by doctors. “In the past, insurers required physician referral for many paramedical services covered by group plans,” says the association. “However, new technologies and changes in plan design tend to cause this practice to decline over time. Insurers, along with employers, are reducing and eliminating the need for physician referrals for services such as physiotherapists and orthoprosthetists. »

Citing widespread professional burnout, theCanadian Medical Association for its part, estimated in 2022 that 46% of doctors across the country would reduce their clinical work hours over the next two years. The survey conducted at the time among 4,121 doctors revealed professional burnout in 53% of respondents and a low level of professional fulfillment in eight out of ten of them.

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