seniors take part in an intergenerational fashion show in Mérignac

LThe room is full. This Saturday, May 25, all the residents of the retirement home and their loved ones are there. A red carpet was rolled out on the floor to welcome the stars of the day. In the back room, behind a white curtain, Nicole, 73, with gold jewelry and a beautiful colorful dress, waits patiently for her turn, like eleven other residents who dared to take the plunge. These residents of the Plein Ciel Autonomy Residence in…

LThe room is full. This Saturday, May 25, all the residents of the retirement home and their loved ones are there. A red carpet was rolled out on the floor to welcome the stars of the day. In the back room, behind a white curtain, Nicole, 73, with gold jewelry and a beautiful colorful dress, waits patiently for her turn, like eleven other residents who dared to take the plunge. These residents of the Plein Ciel Autonomy Residence in Mérignac are preparing to parade for the first time in their lives, hand in hand with a child or a loved one, for an intergenerational parade.

“The goal is to show that we can accept ourselves at any age and to mix several generations in the same activity. For some residents who have pathologies or whose bodies are aging, it is not always easy to accept themselves physically,” explains Kenza Marhfour, president of the Beauty Curves association, which promotes the acceptance of physical and physical differences. organizes the parade.

“It’s a great initiative. I’m not used to dressing like that anymore. Generally, I dress more traditionally. It’s good for self-esteem and allows you to value yourself. Seeing others dress well too, it’s nice, and we think of something else. Plus, I have a friend who came to see me,” says Nicole proudly. It was Fatima Suberville, fashion advisor at Captain Tortue, who recommended the dress to her. “We make sure to find them clothes that they like, based on their body shape. They are already beautiful but we try to enhance them,” she smiles.

“Better in their body”

The music sounds and Nicole rushes off, not impressed by the audience, accompanied by Lyla, 11 years old. Arm in arm, they parade on the red carpet, smiles on their lips, encouraged by the applause from the room. Everyone takes out their phones to immortalize the moment. Two by two, the other residents parade in turn, in an atmosphere of excitement which contrasts with the sometimes difficult daily life of a retirement home. Some shed a few tears in the audience, moved and proud to see these elderly people experience this moment of happiness where they are highlighted.


Most residents were smiling during the parade.

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“For the heart, it’s great! It’s a wonderful moment, it really warms the heart,” says Albert, 85, who chose a beautiful colorful shirt with feathers and a straw hat to show his West Indian origins. With her walker, Solange parades in turn, intimidated by so much encouragement. Her granddaughter is there to watch her. On her arm, Stéphane, 51, came to support her. “This mix of generations is a good thing, especially in a society where the old are sidelined,” he emphasizes.


Nicole and Albert chose colorful clothes to parade in front of residents and their loved ones.

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“It’s an exercise that requires courage, but which allows them to feel better in their body and in their head,” adds Kenza Marhfour. A welcome letting go, while questions of autonomy around “aging well” are slowly beginning to be taken into account in society.

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