Ring the bell, come in and be happy in Theodora’s living room

Ring the bell, come in and be happy in Theodora’s living room
Ring the bell, come in and be happy in Theodora’s living room

In the oldest still active gallery in the Jura, Théodora has brought together under the title The Salon of Yesterday and Today a set of works which recount the romantic choices of their first owners – Liuba Kirova and Peter Fürst, and her own, thus offering creations by young artists met in Geneva where Théodora lives and works.

In addition to the idea of ​​reconstituting a familiar and cozy atmosphere, it was important for the curator of the exhibition to compare old works with more recent ones in order to create a certain idea of ​​timelessness.

A family story

On the walls of this show you will inevitably find a watercolor in azure tones by Peter Fürst, small landscapes by Liuba Kirova and solar houses by Tchouki. The latter, Liuba’s nephew, branched off into agriculture and began raising cattle in the wild countryside of southeastern Bulgaria.

Family history also inspired Leave pro toto, the series of oil paintings by Théodora Quiriconi. In 2006, Liuba’s daughter went to Sofia, to her maternal grandmother’s neighborhood, and brought back around a hundred photographs of building doorbells. These worn, aged, rusty, patched objects offer a sort of grid, a structure that seduces the eye. Théodora, whose works made from pearls are better known, has achieved a trompe l’oeil for each painting where the buttons seem to be in relief, where the glue under the torn off labels seems more real than life, where each material ( bakelite, wood, metal, post-it, enamel paint, rust) is treated in an illusionistic way. Objects in poor condition which seem to suggest the dilapidation of the building, its identity and the difficulties of a city finding a new lease of life.

Robert Indermaur, the master

The portrait that opens the exhibition is an image that must be seen, because it is an image that imprints itself on the heart and mind. The ones that make you smile long after seeing them. A woman – undoubtedly the artist’s wife – in bust, with a mischievous look and a generous smile, stands in front of a monochrome background in marshy green tones. She wears a strange blouse, close to the body, with fabric decorated with fish.

Modern-day mermaid? A small pink bow emerges from her hair, unless it is the tail of a fish that escaped from her blouse. A large neckline reveals bones and muscles, which radiate under the skin like a star. Born in Chur, Robert Indermaur was 41 years old when he exhibited for the first time at Séprais in 1988. His dreamlike and vibrant universe surprises and delights the soul, again and again.

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NEXT Valady. Jean Couet-Guichot and Gaya Wisniewski, two artists in residence within the region