“Go throw yourself at Goudes”, “go and hide at Endoume”… what if you learned to speak like a real Marseillais?

“Go throw yourself at Goudes”, “go and hide at Endoume”… what if you learned to speak like a real Marseillais?
“Go throw yourself at Goudes”, “go and hide at Endoume”… what if you learned to speak like a real Marseillais?

We knew Landolfi, this urban legend who, in Pagnol’s Marius, allowed César to play Monsieur Brun. There is now Dégun, the one that every poorly informed neo-Marseillais seeks to meet, as he is found everywhere. And above all nowhere. Because when we tell you that there is dégun (that the Marseillais will pronounce “un” and not “ain”), it means that there is no one. “The word comes from the Provencal degun and more distantly from the Latin nec unus, literally ‘not one’, which gave forms like nessuno in Italian or ninguém in Portuguese.“, we can read in “In Marseille, it’s said like that”.

On shelves since May 2, the work published by Le Robert is written by the lecturer in sociolinguistics at Aix-Marseille University Médéric Gasquet-Cyrus, also a columnist on France Bleu Provence (103.6 FM), to whom the publisher has entrusted the direction of a new collection on regional French which already includes the Breton language and the language of the North and Picardy.

A collection with an attractive and punchy layout, which, alongside popularized scientific explanations, multiplies examples of the use of words and expressions as found in popular culture, whether songs, films, books, advertisements, etc. Cafoutche, trumpet, mouligas, boucan, go make yourself a soup of esques, go throw yourself at Goudes or go caguer in Endoume: no less than 150 items are listed, accompanied by maps, anecdotes and unusual information. And that’s the whole point of this work that we take pleasure in pitying: whether we’re from Marseille or not, we (re)discover local words and expressions that we sometimes thought were used everywhere in France, their origins and different meanings and we learn the meaning of the latest additions which are already circulating in our neighborhoods like peuchkine, kodo or gari (the car in Comorian, nothing to do with gàrri, the rat).

In other words, it is a very good book, if only because it is the most up-to-date work on Marseille speaking and which, in its bibliography, invites those who want to deepen their knowledge on the subject to delve into dictionaries, glossaries, works and scientific studies dedicated to etymology and sociolinguistics.

“In Marseille, it’s said like that”, by Médéric Gasquet-Cyrus, Le Robert éd., 144 p., €12.90. The author will be signing this Tuesday, May 14 from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at Maupetit, 142, la Canebière (1st) and Thursday, May 16 from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Prado-Paradis bookstore, 19, avenue de Mazargues (8th).

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