Going to bed late causes psychological problems

Going to bed late causes psychological problems
Going to bed late causes psychological problems

The question is regularly debated: does going to bed earlier or later impact sleep quality differently? A recent study published in the medical journal “Psychiatry Research” claims to have found the answer by affirming that it does indeed make a difference.

Researchers at Stanford University analyzed data from more than 70,000 individuals and came to the conclusion that people who regularly go to bed after 1 a.m. are more prone to psychological disorders, including depression and anxiety, than those who sleep before one in the morning.

The study also took into account the chronotype, that is to say the type of sleeper. Morning chronotypes are early risers, while evening chronotypes are more night owls and enjoy sleeping in. But even the latter should avoid going to bed too late. “We found that alignment with chronotype is not crucial and that staying up late is not good for mental health,” says study author Jamie Zeitzer, professor of psychiatry and science. of behavior at Stanford University.

The study revealed that people who are characterized as night owls and go to bed very late have a 20 to 40% higher risk of suffering from psychological disorders than night owls who fall asleep earlier. People who go to bed before 1 a.m. have the lowest volume of mental health diagnosis.

The study also has its detractors: Indira Gurubhagavatula, a professor specializing in sleep medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, objected to “Huffpost” that the subjects who participated in the study were predominantly white and middle-aged or elderly. , which could bias the results.

Furthermore, the relevance of the data is, according to her, not proven. “To determine the chronotype of the participants, only one question was asked. However, the chronotype is generally determined using a much more detailed questionnaire containing much more in-depth questions,” laments Indira Gurubhagavatula. This means that for the purposes of this study, it’s potentially not entirely clear whether the subjects are early risers or night owls. Nevertheless, the results are in line with expectations, as the expert points out.

The impact of when you go to sleep may be a matter of light. As Matthew Lehrer, assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh, explains to Huffpost, “If you go to bed after one or two in the morning, you’ll probably wake up several hours after sunrise. And you will not go to bed until several hours after sunset. “The mismatch with the circadian cycle is potentially problematic,” he adds.

According to him, it is important for our body to receive signals indicating that it is daytime (especially from the sun shining). “If we do not receive these signals or if we receive mixed signals, this can lead to disorders at the biological level, which can have repercussions on the brain,” explains the professor. This could, in turn, negatively impact mental health.

How important is sleep to you? Do you make it a priority?

-

-

PREV this eating habit that he takes 5 times a month
NEXT How to gain 30 minutes of sleep easily?