worrying increase in cases in New Aquitaine, 51 clusters reported since the beginning of 2024

worrying increase in cases in New Aquitaine, 51 clusters reported since the beginning of 2024
worrying increase in cases in New Aquitaine, 51 clusters reported since the beginning of 2024

The Nouvelle-Aquitaine Regional Health Agency is warning about these clusters identified since January 2024, while none had been reported in 2023. Vaccination against whooping cough is however compulsory in infants.

A worrying resurgence. Since January 2024, 51 whooping cough clusters have been identified in New Aquitaine, while none had been reported the previous year, warns the Regional Health Agency (ARS) in a press release published this Wednesday 29 may. As a reminder, a cluster is formed when there are two confirmed cases “whether within the family or in the community”.

“One sick person can contaminate around 15 people,” warns the ARS, which emphasizes the need “to remain very vigilant due to its resurgence in France.”

A “very contagious” infection

Whooping cough is a “very contagious bacterial infection that is transmitted through coughing,” explains the ARS. Certain fragile people, such as newborns, pregnant women and immunocompromised people, who are not vaccinated, can develop serious forms.

Vaccination against whooping cough is in fact compulsory for infants born from January 1, 2018. Infants receive three doses at the ages of two, four and eleven months, before boosters “at different ages of life”. Those around an unborn infant can in particular carry out this reminder: this is “cocooning”.

What treatment for cases of whooping cough? When a case is confirmed, antibiotic treatment is prescribed to the sick person and those around them. The patient should not attend a community before three to five days of treatment.

“To avoid serious forms and hospitalizations, vaccination is the only means of protection against whooping cough,” recalls the ARS.

Margaux de Frouville with Fanny Rocher

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