Keratoconus, or why stop sticking your finger in your eye

Keratoconus, or why stop sticking your finger in your eye
Keratoconus, or why stop sticking your finger in your eye

Repeated friction or pressure on the cornea, the glass of the eye, can deform it. From blurred vision to photophobia, the consequences can be disabling. At an advanced stage, it is sometimes necessary to replace the glass.


Article reserved for subscribers

Default author image


Default author image


By François Hardy

Published on 05/30/2024 at 3:06 p.m.
Reading time: 3 min

VDo you often rub your eyes and at the same time start to see slightly blurred? Like Thomas, 31, who works at night in a port and is often exposed to dust. Or like Harold, 28, who admits to rubbing his eyes a lot because of an allergy to pollen and cat hair. You may have keratoconus in one or both eyes.



This article is reserved for subscribers

Access verified and decrypted national and international information
1€/week for 4 weeks (no commitment)

With this offer, take advantage of:
  • Unlimited access to all editorial articles, files and reports
  • The newspaper in digital version (PDF)
  • Reading comfort with limited advertising
-

-

PREV the hospital again requires the wearing of a mask
NEXT It’s “the only organ in the world that everyone will pay attention to”: a researcher highlights the presence of microplastics in human penises