Doctor Warns Parents Who Stuff Their Babies’ Socks With Potatoes

Doctor Warns Parents Who Stuff Their Babies’ Socks With Potatoes
Doctor Warns Parents Who Stuff Their Babies’ Socks With Potatoes

For some time now, Internet users who are fans of natural remedies have been swearing by a new health tip: place potato slices in infants’ socks. Supposed to relieve fever, colds and other childhood illnesses, this process is making the rounds on social networks, leaving pediatricians perplexed, as explained The Mirror. According to proponents of this method, it would be enough to slip one or two slices of raw potato into the socks of a child with a fever or cold and leave them to act overnight. The next morning, the potato turned black, a sign, according to them, that it had absorbed the toxins responsible for the illness.

Some videos circulating on social media show influencers applying this technique to their babies. One of them even assures that her child’s fever disappeared thanks to this process.. In the comments, many Internet users question its effectiveness and ask if this miracle tip also works against other conditions such as nasal congestion.

A doctor intervenes and denounces a remedy without scientific proof

Faced with this craze for therapeutic potatoes, Dr Lawrence Cunningham, retired general practitioner and expert with the UK Care Guide, is sounding the alarm. He recalls that if the potato could be used in popular remedies, its effectiveness against childhood diseases has never been scientifically proven.

For Dr. Cunningham, the attraction to this method is explained by the search for natural solutions to treat children’s ailments. However, from a scientific point of view, no study supports the idea that potato slices can reduce fever or eliminate toxins.. He emphasizes that the skin plays a barrier role and prevents viruses and bacteria responsible for colds and other illnesses from penetrating the body through simple contact.

A placebo not as harmless as one might think

Although slipping potatoes into socks may not be dangerous in itself, Dr. Cunningham warns of the risks associated with the practice. According to him, relying solely on this method to treat serious pathologies, such as high fever, could delay the implementation of more effective medical treatment.. This risk is all the more worrying in infants and young children whose state of health can deteriorate rapidly in the event of poorly managed fever.

Dr. Cunningham recommends that parents monitor their child’s temperature using a reliable thermometer and seek medical attention if the fever is high or persistent. It also recommends the use of classic medications, such as paracetamol or ibuprofen, administered according to the indicated dosages.. Finally, he recalls the importance of ensuring the child is well hydrated and letting him rest in a cool and comfortable environment for faster healing. Faced with the abundance of information circulating on the internet, Dr. Cunningham urges parents to exercise caution and to favor reliable sources and advice from qualified health professionals.

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