Overconsumption of salt increases the risk of stomach cancer by 41%

Overconsumption of salt increases the risk of stomach cancer by 41%
Overconsumption of salt increases the risk of stomach cancer by 41%

The omnipresence of salt in our diet now constitutes a major challenge for public health on a global scale. If sodium is essential for the proper functioning of the human body, its abuse has disastrous consequences for health. The harms of this excess are well documented, ranging from increased risk of cardiovascular disease and high blood pressure to stroke and kidney disease.

Additionally, excessive salt consumption is often accompanied by other harmful dietary habits, such as low intake of fruits and vegetables, thereby amplifying health risks. Recently, a worrying correlation has come to light: an increased risk of stomach cancer.

Nutrition specialists from the Center for Public Health at the University of Vienna have revealed that in the UK, individuals who regularly consume excessive amounts of salt with their meals have an increased risk of stomach cancer, up to 41% more than those who use it moderately or limitedly.

This study supports the findings of previous research, highlighting that excess salt can damage the protective layer of the stomach, thus promoting the formation of cancerous mutations.

To reach these conclusions, researchers from the University of Vienna analyzed data from 471,144 British adults over a period of 11 years. The results clearly demonstrated that individuals who consumed salt intensively or excessively had a 41% higher risk of stomach cancer than those who had limited use.

These results remained significant even after adjusting for other variables such as age, socioeconomic status and other lifestyle choices such as alcohol consumption and smoking, as reported in the journal British “Daily Mail”.

It is also important to note that stomach cancer ranks fifth among the most common cancers worldwide, and the risk of developing this disease increases with age. However, the most recent statistics reveal a worrying trend of increasing cases among adults under the age of 50.

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