“Governments wonder how much health will cost them”: testimony from a retired dermatologist

“Governments wonder how much health will cost them”: testimony from a retired dermatologist
“Governments wonder how much health will cost them”: testimony from a retired dermatologist

the essential
Dermatologists are not spared from the crisis in the medical field. Getting an appointment is an obstacle course. Monitoring yourself to spot the slightest alarming sign has become essential. At a conference in Prayssas, Doctor Bernard Lamey, retired dermatologist, will give keys to better understanding the signs of skin cancer.

“As much as possible, we must avoid having to correct cancers through surgery. Prevention plays an essential role. We evaluate the risk factors, and we check if we are not at risk of developing one.” The words of Bernard Lamey, former dermatologist, are clear. During a conference at the Prayssas village hall, Friday May 24, he will give his advice to optimize screening and prevention. In the background, a major problem: dermatologists cannot escape the scourge of the medical desert.

“Public authorities have the vision of accountants”

In the profession, they even constitute the body most affected by this crisis. In our department, it is difficult, if not impossible, to obtain an appointment, especially if you are a new patient. From now on, a Lot-et-Garonnais person finds himself obliged to go for a consultation in Bordeaux or Toulouse, if not further away. And generally, no appointment for several months. The risk is that a cancer develops quickly due to lack of detection.

“This shortage of doctors affects all specialties, not just general practitioners,” sighs the retired doctor. Since the Juppé laws 25 years ago, all our successive governments believe that health is too expensive. They wanted to implement this numerus clausus in medical schools, to anticipate our retirements. In their logic, the fewer doctors there are, the fewer patients there are, which is a completely crazy idea. And always in their mind, fewer doctors and patients cost Social Security less. The public authorities have the vision of accountants, they are systematically asking themselves how much health will cost them.”

High frequency, younger patients

His conference at Prayssas will not be a screening session. The goal is to show people how to monitor themselves to prevent cancer. “I’m here to help people take care of themselves,” continues Bernard Lamey. “The most serious case is obviously melanoma, due to brutal exposure to the sun since childhood. But other cases of cancer are linked to chronic accumulation, such as exposure to UV rays in the cabin.”

Cases of skin cancer are constantly increasing. The retired dermatologist observes a high frequency of these pathologies, and, what is perhaps even more alarming, more and more young people are affected. Children, adolescents and young adults. “Is this due to environmental factors?” asks Bernard Lamey. “Difficult to say, this point is not really clear. But healthy lifestyle plays its role in this area. Diet must be taken into consideration. People must feel responsible for their health.”

Conference in the Prayssas village hall at 7 p.m. FREE ENTRANCE. Information on 07 49 53 06 47.
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