Why do people comment “Ozempic” under photos that show bodies?

Why do people comment “Ozempic” under photos that show bodies?
Why do people comment “Ozempic” under photos that show bodies?

An eternal topic of conversation, whether it’s the latest too-tight corset dress Kim Kardashian at the Met Gala 2024, or Ariana Grande’s weight, women’s bodies have always been the subject of discussion. And since the appearance of social networks and the overexposure of celebrities, the “body police” are rife every time a stomach seems too flat (hello Emily Ratajkowski), thighs too muscular (like those of Serena Williams), or an overly exposed chest (we loved Aya Nakamura’s dress at the Met Gala). And with its hasty judgments and ever more standardized requirements, the Internet sphere also creates trends that emerge very quickly, once unknown words that become memes. This is the case of the word “Ozempic“, which we saw appear in hundreds of comments under the Instagram post of the actress of the series Girls, Jemima Kirk, in May 2023, showing herself made up and dressed for a shoot. But what does this word mean, which doesn’t sound very glam?

What is Ozempic?

Behind theOzempic hides a drug which has had phenomenal success for months, despite itself. Injectable treatment that has become a star on TikTok, Ozempic is originally a antidiabetic whose active ingredient, semaglutide, acts on blood sugar control. The problem is that consumers perceived in this treatment slimming properties exceptional, with weight losses of around 10% per year. If the French Medicines Agency has, for its part, alerted health professionals to the misuse of Ozempic, Gen Z continues to obtain it using falsified prescriptions or from poorly trained doctors. honest. Now viral around the world, the drug for diabetics has become the reference slimming younger people, who are now convinced that when a public figure appears with a so-called “thin” physique, it is because of Ozempic. But whether this is the case or not, should we shout it from the rooftops?

The “Ozempic” comments, witness to a social phenomenon

If comments constitute the very essence of freedom of expression, they are nonetheless tools that must be mastered with kindness and logic. In response to comments under his post, Jemima Kirke precisely explained that she would have “loved that it was the Ozempic“, continuing “How can you make such specific conclusions and judgments about a person based on their size?“. Because the whole problem with social networks is there: we comment, without knowing the context, on the person’s life, their health, their genetics, or anything else that could impact their physical appearance. And it’s no secret that comments have a significant impact on self-esteem (and social networks in general, since according to a study, 40% of Instagram users have felt “unattractive” since they use the platform1), and significantly impact mental health of the person concerned. So can you really worry about the health of someone you don’t know? Everyone has their own answer, considering whether it is their business or not, the main thing being that no judgment is made.

1″Facebook Knows Instagram Is Toxic for Teen Girls, Company Documents Show” https://www.wsj.com/articles/facebook-knows-instagram-is-toxic-for-teen-girls-company-documents-show-11631620739

@radio.canada.info #Ozempic his name is everywhere, but new molecules could however put an end to the monopoly of the king of weight loss, in what several medical experts describe as a real revolution. But these advances may never benefit those who need it most, we explain. #weightloss #pertepoids #poids #wegovy #mounjaro #diabetes #infotiktok? original sound – Radio-Canada Information
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