High salt intake increases the risk of stomach cancer

High salt intake increases the risk of stomach cancer
High salt intake increases the risk of stomach cancer

People who frequently add salt to their diet have a 40% increased risk of developing stomach cancer compared to those who do not use the salt shaker at the table.

High salt consumption is often associated with a risk of developing cardiovascular disease. It can in fact increase blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular events. It also contributes to increasing the risk of water retention and osteoporosis.

A study carried out by the Medical University of Vienna (MedUni Vienna) reveals a new harm. This work shows that people who frequently add salt to their food have around 40% more risk of developing stomach cancer than those who do not.

The researchers used data from more than 470,000 adults. Between 2006 and 2010, participants answered a questionnaire including the question “How often do you add salt to your food?“. The team then compared the survey results with salt excretion in urine and data from national cancer registries.

No more than 5g per day

It found that people who said they always or often added salt to their food had a 39% increased risk of developing stomach cancer.

Stomach cancer is the fifth most common cancer worldwide.“, remind the authors.”The risk of this tumor increases with age, but the latest statistics reveal a worrying increase in adults under 50. Risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, overweight and obesity“… Factors to which we must now add increased salt consumption.

Remember that the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends not consuming more than 5g of salt per day for an adult, 2g for a child. However, in Europe, we consume on average 8 to 19g of salt per day.

To note : Studies carried out among Asian populations, who frequently consume highly salty foods (fish, sauces, marinades) had already proven that a very salty diet increased the risk of stomach cancer.

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