MENTAL HEALTH and CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH, closely linked among young people

MENTAL HEALTH and CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH, closely linked among young people
MENTAL HEALTH and CARDIOVASCULAR HEALTH, closely linked among young people

These findings highlight the importance of monitoring cardiovascular risk factors in young women experiencing anxiety or depression.

Depression and anxiety can double cardiovascular risk

The study analyzes the medical records of 71,214 participants from the Mass General Brigham Biobank. Participants with pre-existing heart disease or a history of diagnosis of anxiety disorders or depression at baseline were excluded. Participants were followed over 10 years for the development of high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. The analysis reveals that:

  • 38% of participants developed high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes during the study;
  • participants with a history of anxiety or depression are 55% more likely to develop risk factors;
  • participants under the age of 50 who suffer from anxiety or depression are almost twice as likely to develop cardiovascular risk factors;
  • despite the low initial risk of heart disease, anxiety and depression significantly increase cardiovascular risk of young women, at or almost the same level as that, generally higher, of young men.

So, mental health problems can increase the risk of heart disease. The research therefore highlights the importance of monitoring the cardiovascular health of young women with anxiety or depressive disorders.

-

-

PREV Infections acquired in hospital: one in 15 patients is affected
NEXT A “pediatric pathologies and pesticides” consultation open at the Amiens University Hospital