Why anger increases your risk of having a heart attack

Why anger increases your risk of having a heart attack
Why anger increases your risk of having a heart attack

The mustard that rises to the nose, the screams that echo, the heat stroke… The tantrum poisons our social relationships. But a recent study reveals that it is also very bad for our health. More specifically, intense anger, even short-lived, would increase our risk of having a heart attack. For what?

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What does the study reveal?

Other studies had already shown that negative emotions – anxiety, anger, sadness – increased the risk of having a heart attack and stroke. But until now we haven’t been able to explain why. Researchers from Columbia University in the United States have looked into the consequences of an outburst of anger on our body.

They argue that angry blows damage the arteries in an article published on May 1, 2024 in the Journal of the American Heart Association. More precisely, “brief outbursts of anger can temporarily damage the ability of blood vessels to dilate properly, a function that would be essential to prevent arteries from hardening,” the press release reveals.

“Anger is bad for the functioning of your blood vessels,” says the study’s lead author, Dr. Daichi Shimbo, a cardiologist and co-director of the Hypertension Center at Columbia University Irving Medical Center in New York. This impairs the functioning of your arteries, which is linked to future risk of heart attack.”

Other interesting information: sadness and anxiety have not caused a significant impact on the arteries and therefore on the risk of having a heart attack.

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