Investissement Québec keeps secret a document on the risks linked to waste from the battery sector

Investissement Québec keeps secret a document on the risks linked to waste from the battery sector
Investissement Québec keeps secret a document on the risks linked to waste from the battery sector

Does Investissement Québec (IQ) have a document of public interest on the risks associated with waste from the battery industry subsidized to the tune of billions of dollars? Yes, but it refuses to provide it to the Journal.

“We have located a document covered by your request. Our analysis of the latter leads us to conclude that we cannot give it to you,” replied Danielle Vivier, Director of Access to Information at Investissement Québec.

“This essentially contains confidential information, particularly of a technical and scientific nature, both for the Company and the third parties involved. In addition, this document includes opinions and recommendations,” it says.

In IQ communications, Mathieu Rouy explains that this information “constitutes an industrial secret for Investissement Québec and the third parties involved, within the meaning of the articles of the law invoked in the response. Redacting this information would remove the substance of the document.”

Early June, The newspaper asked IQ for “studies, reports and analyses from the last five years on waste, by-products and outputs from the battery sector and the risks (of all types) inherent therein.”


Provided by Investissement Québec


Battery sector

Provided by Investissement Québec

Document secret

IQ found only one, but the government’s financial arm won’t share it, even redacted.

The Ministry of Economy, Innovation and Energy (MEIE) reminds us that certain documents have already been disseminated and are available online on the Northvolt and Nemaska ​​Lithium websites as well as in environmental assessment registers.

“Other documents are not accessible because they contain information that has an impact on the economy or are drafts, rough drafts, preparatory notes or other documents of the same nature or are protected by intellectual property,” says Pierre Bouchard, head of access at the MEIE.

“The Ministry cannot transmit documents transmitted confidentially by a third party, even if redacted, without their consent,” explains MEIE spokesperson Jean-Pierre d’Auteuil.

Highlights

Last Thursday, Ottawa assured that Northvolt’s $7 billion mega-battery factory will see the light of day in Montérégie, despite the uncertainty now hanging over the schedule of the largest private project in Quebec’s history.

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