AI: skilled jobs would be most likely to be impacted

AI: skilled jobs would be most likely to be impacted
AI: skilled jobs would be most likely to be impacted

Since the generalization of AI among the general public, several studies have warned about its consequences in the world of work, both good and bad. According to a report published in Sciencethese patterns are more likely to impact high earners and skilled occupations, such as computer engineers and data science experts.

18.5% of professions would be impacted by AI

Based on 923 professions, the study reveals that 18.5% of employees could see half of their tasks carried out by new technological advances such as AI. This is a prediction from the GPT-4-LLM model, which was subjected to several variables, as well as human analysis. The large language model analyzed whether the technology was able to at least halve the time needed to complete a task without impacting its quality.

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The study was led by two employees of OpenAI (company to which we owe ChatGPT) and by the Center for the Governance of AI, a British non-profit organization.

Manual professions would escape AI

It appears that skilled trades would be the first to be impacted. Among the professions affected are blockchain engineers, biomedical data managers, public relations specialists and quantitative market finance analysts.

Manual trades, such as mechanics, repairers, mechanics, athletes and even stonemasons, would be the least affected. Only 34 of the 923 professions analyzed are safe from future AI disruptions, according to this study.

Obviously, this is only a prediction from GPT-4-LLM and a human analysis carried out by several experts. Nothing is definitive about the impact of this technology in the world of work, whether positive or not. This study also aims to protect professions that could be significantly affected by the mainstream adoption of AI. On the other hand, as explained The IT worldthese models could also help create 500 million jobs by 2033.

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