Emirates and Lufthansa bosses complain about Boeing delays

Emirates and Lufthansa bosses complain about Boeing delays
Emirates and Lufthansa bosses complain about Boeing delays

The American aircraft manufacturer’s production is collapsing due to multiple investigations by the regulator following various incidents that have affected its aircraft.

Boeing’s major customers are losing patience. And express their frustration at the numerous delays in the delivery of new devices while traffic continues to increase.

“Extremely annoying” delays, judges the general director of Lufthansa, Carsten Spohr, interviewed by the Swiss newspaper Neue Zuercher Zeitung.

“It’s extremely annoying and costs us a lot of money,” he adds. “However, I am certain that Boeing will succeed in controlling the problems,” the manager wants to believe.

“Everyone has an interest in Boeing soon being able to build large planes more reliably again,” he said.

“Not satisfied”

Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al Maktoum, chairman and CEO of Emirates, Boeing’s biggest customer, is less diplomatic.

“Get your act together! We’re not really happy with what’s happening,” he said at the Arabian Travel Market in Dubai.

“The management promised to change things and make things go faster, I hope,” he explains.

Remember that the American aircraft manufacturer’s production is collapsing due to multiple investigations by the regulator following the various incidents which affected its aircraft. In the first quarter, Boeing delivered just 83 planes, the lowest figure since mid-2021. And at the same time, the long-haul 777-X has still not been certified.

Consequences on summer flight plans

With demand for air travel expected to be very strong for the holidays, and the number of travelers worldwide expected to reach historic levels, with 4.7 billion people expected in 2024, compared to 4.5 billion in 2019, the sector is currently facing a shortage of new aircraft.

According to Martha Neubauer, senior associate at AeroDynamic Advisory, cited by Reuters, carriers will receive 19% fewer planes than expected a year ago, a figure that rises to 32% for American companies.

Enough to force certain companies, particularly those most dependent on Boeing, to review their flight plans or even reduce the capacities offered even if they have levers to compensate for these missing deliveries (in particular by renting aircraft).

At Ryanair for example, 17 Boeing aircraft are missing this summer (40 instead of 57), “adjustments” will therefore have to be made in July and August on around ten routes, warns the low cost airline. Which means less frequency on certain destinations.

Olivier Chicheportiche Journalist BFM Business

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