A photographer fools the jury of an AI competition with this real photo

A photographer fools the jury of an AI competition with this real photo
A photographer fools the jury of an AI competition with this real photo

To prove that artificial intelligence has not (completely) replaced the work of artists, a photographer made the crazy bet of presenting an authentic photograph to the international AI-generated image competition. And drum roll… He fooled the jury!

Quite a bold idea. Today, thanks to artificial intelligence (AI), like Midjourney, it is possible to create images, from scratch, in one click. And that, for the less fervent of AI, it represents a threat to artistic and creative professions. (And we understand them!)
To oppose this, photographer Miles Astray had the brilliant idea of ​​presenting to the competition jury 1839 Photography Awards in category IA, one of these authentic photographs entitled Flamingone.

A real photograph fools the juries

Flamingone was taken by Miles Astray during his stay in Aruba, a Dutch island in the Caribbean Sea, located off the coast of Venezuela. At the center of the photograph, the juries could contemplate a pink flamingo alone, near the sea, headless.

To the great surprise of the artist, this refined work goes unnoticed for a computer-generated creation. “I presented this photo to the jury to prove that human-made content had not lost its relevance, and that Mother Nature and her human interpreters could still beat the machine.”he explains on his website.

“There were of course ethical concerns, so I hoped that the jury and the public would find that this attack on AI and its ethical implications outweigh the ethical implications of misleading the viewer, which, of course, is ironic because that’s what AI does.”

First real photo to win an artificial intelligence prize

Miles Astray, however, ends up admitting the truth about this work and is disqualified by the members of the jury. His militant act earned him, however, the public award (People’s Vote Award) as well as the third prize of the jury awarded by, among others, representatives of the New York Times, Christie’s auction house, Getty Images, the Center Pompidou and the Phaidon publishing house. “Obviously there were ethical concerns about misleading the jury, which I did not take lightly. But I hoped that these industry professionals and the public would find that this attack on AI and its ethical implications outweigh the ethical implications of deceiving the viewer, which, of course, is ironic because that’s what AI does”, he declared on his site.

Obviously, it was a winning bet since he was also pleasantly surprised to discover an e-mail from Lily Fierman, co-founder and director of the competition, in which she told him expressed his admiration for the “powerful message that he had conveyed and that she wanted it to arouse awareness” and brings L'”hope to the many photographers concerned about AI“, reports the Beaux-Arts magazine.

You may also be interested in:

Vandalism: what are the risks if we damage a work of art in the museum?
This painting by Caravaggio is undoubtedly one of the most scandalous works in the History of Art

Manhole covers become works of art in Japan

Art: how new technologies make it possible to restore works of art from the past

Should African works of art acquired during colonization be returned?

When visiting the museum, we all memorize the same works of art!

-

-

NEXT Art in Luxembourg: Street art on display over 200 meters